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Ask Bushi:
Original Poster: Bushi
Forum: Grappling & Jiu-Jitsu
Posted On: 30-07-2007, 15:43

Orginal Post: Bushi: [quote=bamboo 
My question- How do attack someone thats constantly “shrimping” from standup. What would be a sound strategy? I ask this from a grappling standpoint, no strikes.

-bamboo[/quote 

I assume you mean passing their open guard (their down, you are up). I will give you suggestions for both gi and no-gi.

The key to attacking someone who is extremely mobile in their guard is controlling their hips. This can be done in a variety of ways. I usually control their legs by either pressuring them into the mat, elevating them to where their hips are off the ground or a combination of the two. This is the guiding principle when dealing with the guard period.

That being said, here is a suggestion for each.

GI: I establish a cross grip (ex. my right hand on their right leg)on their pants leg (about six inches below the knee). My other hand (left in this example) establishes a grip on their sleeve (just below the wrist, their right hand). Once this is established, I step to that side at about a 45 and jerk them into the air (like whipping the dust out of a rug) This causes their hips (via their right leg) to be elevated and thus immobile while I step in to go knee on stomach (my right knee). They settle with me in knee on stomach. I can then establish side control or attack with subs.

No-Gi: The above example can work no-gi, but it will be more difficult and the grips change to the ankle and wrist. Here is a better one.

When attacking the no-gi open guard, it is better to up the speed and athletic factor due to how slick things are. If my opponent keeps shrimping away, I will pin his down knee to the mat (my left hand pushes down on the inside of his right knee) thus immobilizing his hip as I dive in (while sprawling on top of the downed leg) and under hook his other leg (my right under his left) If I sprawl hard while penduluming (to my left) keeping his hips immobilized, I will pass his guard. Once I am 90 degrees to him and past the legs and my ear is on his hip bone (my left ear) I can realese the hand pressing on the leg (my left) and under hook his head to settle the position.

On a side note, during a scramble no-gi where the guy is shrimping away and re-establishing guard, try sneaking your near knee in to knee on stomach (KOS) as a quick blocker to him getting his legs back in. It is almost always there and most do not utilize it. You will probably not get to establish KOS fully since its no-gi, but it will block his hips enough for you to establish the pass.

Try that and good luck.

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Galaknore How do you set up the triangle when you are going for the double armbar, or when you have your guard way up high? do you just wait for them to pull an arm out, or do you push one arm out of the guard yourself? I keep getting to this position, but I can’t finish it. Any help would be great.[/quote 

Anytime you have your guard way up high on an opponent, he will feel it necessary to try and push himself away. This provides a great opportunity to “feed the triangle”. Imagine that your hips are a Venus fly trap in this case. His wrist (which ever one) is the fly. Pull on his wrist, which should casue him to pull back. Once he pulls back, snap you legs open and smash (feed the wrist and arm, since they are connected) through your legs, then snap the legs back closed on the back of his neck. It is a quick and violent motion (element of suprise) just like the fly trap. You can now pull the head down and establish the triangle.

Work with this as a principle based technique and you will see the set-ups that start to develop.

Good luck.>

Post: bamboo:

Thank you Bushi.
I will sticky this thread so please do check back as I know myself and perhaps others will continue to have questions as we develop in the ground aspect of the game. :D

-bamboo>

Post: Bushi:

I will.>

Post: Galaknore:

Since no one else is taking advantage. When you are going for the kimura from cross body or side mount do you put your knee behind the opponents head or do you hook your leg over it? I have seen it both and I guess I am wondering if it makes it easier to lock in the kimura either way.>

Post: novabiker:

Bushi,

Where do you teach at? How long at purple?>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Galaknore Since no one else is taking advantage. When you are going for the kimura from cross body or side mount do you put your knee behind the opponents head or do you hook your leg over it? I have seen it both and I guess I am wondering if it makes it easier to lock in the kimura either way.[/quote 

I step over the head and stck them on their side. The more on their side they are the better control you will have and pressure for the lock.

I step over their head spin up and on top of their head with my crotch. The same stepping leg drops to a knee behind their back while my other foot sucks in tight to their chest creating a vice on their torso. I trap their other arm by having my heel in their armpit while sitting or kinda kneeling on their head.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=novabiker Bushi,

Where do you teach at? How long at purple?[/quote 

I have been teaching here www.kombatfit.com for a about two years, but just got my Purple a month ago.

Where do you train?>

Post: zefff:

What to develop first, subs or sweeps? Keep in mind I dont really care for BJJ sport but might fight MMA in a few months.

I am subbing a lot of blue belts now after 5 months but find myself mostly using brute force or unorthadox movements to gain position. Should I forget working on subs and start working on developing sweeps and position?

(BTW my most successful subs are not armbars and triangles, I dont think Ive ever caught a higher ranked player with either).>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=zefff What to develop first, subs or sweeps? Keep in mind I dont really care for BJJ sport but might fight MMA in a few months.

I am subbing a lot of blue belts now after 5 months but find myself mostly using brute force or unorthadox movements to gain position. Should I forget working on subs and start working on developing sweeps and position?

(BTW my most successful subs are not armbars and triangles, I dont think Ive ever caught a higher ranked player with either).[/quote 

This is a great question. The most important thing is positional dominance. Postionally dominate a guy and the subs will come. From white to blue, I never concerned myself with learning the newest and coolest sub. I developed my top control, sweeps and guard passing ability. Develop that and suddenly submissions start appearing out of no where. The key to focusing on this is drills, drills, and more drills.

Play a lot of Pass or Sweep games when you spar. For those that do not know, Pass or sweep is a structured sparring session where you and your opponent are only allowed to either pass the guard or sweep. If one accomplishes this task, then you reset and start again.

Once again, Great question.>

Post: novabiker:

Okay, I thought that was you. I met you a couple of weeks ago, I was looking at joining David Jacobs class over in Loudon Co. Which do you think is closer to Warrenton, your school or his (in the new location)?>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=novabiker Okay, I thought that was you. I met you a couple of weeks ago, I was looking at joining David Jacobs class over in Loudon Co. Which do you think is closer to Warrenton, your school or his (in the new location)?[/quote 

What’s up Man. Small world.

I would suggest Mapquesting it and then factor in Traffic. Can you make it to mine on a Saturday? There is a way to train at both Dave’s and mine since we are both Yamasaki and the fact that he is my Instructor. I will work with your schedule and budget, so let me know.>

Post: novabiker:

Saturdays are good, what is your class size? Dave’s were pretty sizeable, but then I hear he is top notch! I will mapquest it and get back at you.>

Post: :

First, Bushi, I don’t think I’ve congratulated you yet, so Congrats!!

How long have you been training BJJ? Don’t you also have a Aikido background or am thinking of someone else?

How are your classes structured?

Lastly, what types of drills do you guys do to help develop certain positions, movements, etc?>

Post: dscott:

I don’t practice BJJ so forgive me if it doesn’t apply but…..are there any pressure points that are used in BJJ to escape submissions or help apply submissions?>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=novabiker Saturdays are good, what is your class size? Dave’s were pretty sizeable, but then I hear he is top notch! I will mapquest it and get back at you.[/quote 

My class size floats around 10-15. I’ve had some get into the 20s, but that is just rare.

You are welcome to come out anytime you like.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=fightauthority.com First, Bushi, I don’t think I’ve congratulated you yet, so Congrats!!

How long have you been training BJJ? Don’t you also have a Aikido background or am thinking of someone else?

How are your classes structured?

Lastly, what types of drills do you guys do to help develop certain positions, movements, etc?[/quote 

Thanks man.

Yeah I haven’t been studying BJJ that long. I got my Blue in 6 months of training then I got my Purple at the 2.5 year mark. I train 10+ classes a week though (no shit) so that might have something to do with it.

As far as my background, I have a BB in Goju Karate, a BB in Nisei Kito Ryu Jiu-jitsu, a Brown in Judo and I did Aikido for a number of years.

My class is 20 minutes Warm-ups, 20 mintutes Drilling, 20 minutes Technique and 30 minutes sparring.

The drills I emphasis the most are:
Knee through pass
Matador pass drill
Knee on stomach(KOS) pop-ups
KOS spins
Straddle mount drills
Pendulum drill
Hip switches
Pyramid shrimps
Sit-outs
Armbar from Guard and mount
Triangles from guard
Kimuras from Guard
Hip bump drill
Etc. Etc. I could go on forever.

I feel drills have been the deciding factor in my quick progression in BJJ.

I spent at least 30 minutes a day solo drilling up until I tore my meniscus.

I just had surgery last Wednesday and plan to hit the drills even harder when I get back.

I hope this answered your questions.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=dscott I don’t practice BJJ so forgive me if it doesn’t apply but…..are there any pressure points that are used in BJJ to escape submissions or help apply submissions?[/quote 

No not really. The problem with pressure points is that they are a fine motor skill that break down under stress. I once sparred a guy that tried pressure points on me. The problem was he was to concerned with getting them instead of escaping which led to him getting caught constantly. I feel that the effort put forth trying PPs is best served escaping or creating space. JMHO

On second thought, we do use PP…they are either applied to the neck or some joint. :lol:>

Post: zefff:

I am thinking about entering this ADCC affiliated grappling competiton: http://www.bjj.eu.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=280&Itemid=27

Ive never attended or even spectated at a grappling comp apart from net vids. What should I expect on the day and throughout the day? Of course I know you can only generalise but what kind of things happen and what can go wrong etc? Also I have one month to prepare. How best might I spend this time in training? Should I keep working on position for points?

Oh and I am a novice with 5 months BJJ. What usually constitutes a novice? I train with other white belts who are awesome because they have black belts in Judo. Should I expect to face these kinds of opponents?

Cheers!>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=zefff I am thinking about entering this ADCC affiliated grappling competiton: http://www.bjj.eu.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=280&Itemid=27

Ive never attended or even spectated at a grappling comp apart from net vids. What should I expect on the day and throughout the day? Of course I know you can only generalise but what kind of things happen and what can go wrong etc? Also I have one month to prepare. How best might I spend this time in training? Should I keep working on position for points?

Oh and I am a novice with 5 months BJJ. What usually constitutes a novice? I train with other white belts who are awesome because they have black belts in Judo. Should I expect to face these kinds of opponents?

Cheers![/quote 

Competitions consist of a whole lot of “Hurry up and wait” situations. Two things will happen with your weigh-in. You will weigh-in when you get there and wait to compete or you will weigh-in right before your division is called. If it is the early weigh-in eat right after. You will probably have a few hours before you compete. If it is before you get on the mat, then eat and snack up until an hourand a half of your weigh-in. Remember everything at a tourney will generally run about 1/2 to 2 hours behind schedule.

Before getting on the mat, make sure you have a nice sweat going. Do not step on the mat without having warmed-up. Do some pummelling drills, duck-unders and drilling to get warm. Relax and remember to have fun. I enjoy the test and love the tourney enviroment.

The month prior to your comp, spar the same way you are going to compete. Do not try to develop new moves and technique try to perfect your game and formulate your game plan. (If you need help with that just let me know). Start from the standing position and spar the full time. Get a copy of the rules and train within them. This is the only way to prepare.

Do a drop in at another school in the area just to get some experience against unknown opponents. Be cool and they should not have a problem. If that is not an option, then just do with what you got.

A novice is usually under a year grappling. Good Luck.>

Post: Sparky-bjj:

Hi Bushi,

I wanted you to ask what you think of the ‘gogo plata’. Do you think it has any value or do you think it’s a very low percentage move? Everytime I try it (wich is not often :) ) I lose it because when I try to grab my leg and pull it down over my opponents shoulder, my opponent always manages to slide his shoulder out, even with the gi on. Do you have any tips for securing this submission? Or is it just something wich only works when your opponent is not paying attention to the fight?
Also I wanted your opinion on leglocks. I like them a lot and I believe in them, but I’ve noticed that a lot of bjj players simply don’t believe in them and almost never include them in their game. Because they’re supposedly easy to escape and hard and dangerous for your position to secure. But whem I’m rolling with a higher belt I almost only manage to submit them using leglocks (especially with the toe hold, straight kneebar and the inverted heelhook). I can’t deny I sometimes lose my position, but this happens with other submission attempts as well. Japanes fighters also seem to include leglocks in their game. Anyway, thanx for your time.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Sparky-bjj Hi Bushi,

I wanted you to ask what you think of the ‘gogo plata’. Do you think it has any value or do you think it’s a very low percentage move? Everytime I try it (wich is not often :) ) I lose it because when I try to grab my leg and pull it down over my opponents shoulder, my opponent always manages to slide his shoulder out, even with the gi on. Do you have any tips for securing this submission? Or is it just something wich only works when your opponent is not paying attention to the fight?[/quote 

I wish I could give you solid answers on this set-up and submission, the problem is I cannot. I use to try this sub like a year ago and just stopped doing it. I do not have the flexability for the move, of course if you have the ability try working with it. This description and photo outlay is pretty good. http://www.lockflow.com/article_view.php?id=1194 my only criticism is she not using both her arms to finish the choke. I know its not much, but hope that helps.

Quote:
Also I wanted your opinion on leglocks. I like them a lot and I believe in them, but I’ve noticed that a lot of bjj players simply don’t believe in them and almost never include them in their game. Because they’re supposedly easy to escape and hard and dangerous for your position to secure. But whem I’m rolling with a higher belt I almost only manage to submit them using leglocks (especially with the toe hold, straight kneebar and the inverted heelhook). I can’t deny I sometimes lose my position, but this happens with other submission attempts as well. Japanes fighters also seem to include leglocks in their game. Anyway, thanx for your time.

I personally do not use them a whole lot. It is a personal thing, I would rather pass the guard, escape to a better position or just try something else. It’s not that I do not like them, I do, I just do not use them a whole lot. I do not think they’re cheap or anything like that, hell I know some leglock wizards, I just do not use them that much. I may go for one once a month. (and get it :wink: )

I do not teach them to my students until I see them becoming guard pass wizards, the reason is I notice new guys (and gals) use leglocks as a crutch to poor guard passing. Once I see them passing the guard and doing it with some proficiency, then I let them incorporate leglocks. Once again, I think they are great, but the tendency is for some people to attempt the leglock instead of improving position, which I think will harm their progression in the long run.

I hope that answers your questions.>

Post: Sparky-bjj:

Thanx for your answers!>

Post: Tease T Tickle:

I’ve encountered some problems in my sidemount/scarf positions. From sidemount, I try to keep my knee and elbow as tight to their hip as possible to keep them from moving their lower body, but if they bridge me I switch to the scarf to put more weight down on them so they can’t lift up. From this position, though, if they have strong bridging and shrimping skills (at least I think they might be shrimping in there) they can usually get enough space to wiggle around and give me trouble. How do I keep this position solid enough so that I can use it as a striking platform? Thanks.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Tease T Tickle I’ve encountered some problems in my sidemount/scarf positions. From sidemount, I try to keep my knee and elbow as tight to their hip as possible to keep them from moving their lower body, but if they bridge me I switch to the scarf to put more weight down on them so they can’t lift up. From this position, though, if they have strong bridging and shrimping skills (at least I think they might be shrimping in there) they can usually get enough space to wiggle around and give me trouble. How do I keep this position solid enough so that I can use it as a striking platform? Thanks.[/quote 

Good question. When in side control, I usually float between two basic positions, I know them as 100 kilos and Cross body Mount. 100 Kilos looks like this

http://groundfighters.net/images/IMAGE004.JPG

If I feel the guy hipping out, I go to cross body mount. From the above picture, take your right arm and over hook his right arm hugging his tricep. Your right armpit will be in his face. You will now have more weight on his body. As you do this simaltaneously scoop your left arm under his body on his left side checking his hip movement. You also want to straighten your left leg adding extra protection from him getting his left knee into your hip to create space. Your right knee can now bend and be placed next to his head. You basically reversed the first position while staying on the same side. I flow from the first to the second then back. These positions should give you great control over your opponent.

The second position allows you to drop elbows (your right arm) and throw knees to his ribs (your left knee). You can also hammer fist the abdomen with the scooping hand (just constantlt check back to the scoop to maintain control) Practice transitioning between these, it works great and I give people hell with them. Also, from the second position it is easy to transition to North / South, hell you are practically there already.

Play with it and let me know.>

Post: Tapout95:

[quote=Bushi [quote=Tease T Tickle I’ve encountered some problems in my sidemount/scarf positions. From sidemount, I try to keep my knee and elbow as tight to their hip as possible to keep them from moving their lower body, but if they bridge me I switch to the scarf to put more weight down on them so they can’t lift up. From this position, though, if they have strong bridging and shrimping skills (at least I think they might be shrimping in there) they can usually get enough space to wiggle around and give me trouble. How do I keep this position solid enough so that I can use it as a striking platform? Thanks.[/quote 

Good question. When in side control, I usually float between two basic positions, I know them as 100 kilos and Cross body Mount. 100 Kilos looks like this

http://groundfighters.net/images/IMAGE004.JPG

If I feel the guy hipping out, I go to cross body mount. From the above picture, take your right arm and over hook his right arm hugging his tricep. Your right armpit will be in his face. You will now have more weight on his body. As you do this simaltaneously scoop your left arm under his body on his left side checking his hip movement. You also want to straighten your left leg adding extra protection from him getting his left knee into your hip to create space. Your right knee can now bend and be placed next to his head. You basically reversed the first position while staying on the same side. I flow from the first to the second then back. These positions should give you great control over your opponent.

The second position allows you to drop elbows (your right arm) and throw knees to his ribs (your left knee). You can also hammer fist the abdomen with the scooping hand (just constantlt check back to the scoop to maintain control) Practice transitioning between these, it works great and I give people hell with them. Also, from the second position it is easy to transition to North / South, hell you are practically there already.

Play with it and let me know.[/quote 

I don’t know if I’m picturing this right, but couldn’t the man on the bottem then just place his right arm on your right shoulder and push while bridging to just spin to his left side to twist out of it and grab your right leg with his left arm and reverse the position? I know I probably just screwed up somewhere.>

Post: Bushi:

Well, lets see. He cannot push my right shoulder with his right hand because I am hugging his right arm with my right arm while laying on top of his chest. He cannot twist to his left because my left arm is chalking his torso on the his left side.

I tried to find a picture on-line but could not, I will continue to look.>

Post: Bushi:

I found the escape you may be referencing.

http://www.bjj.org/techniques/intheguard/crossmount/

The difference between the top position shown here and the one I am talking about is control of the opponents right arm, angle more towards N/S position and straighten the left leg as opposed to having both knees in. If you sprawl on your opponent, more towards his face it is hard for him to do the turn manuever shown in the link. Watch the vid underneath and you should see what I’m talking about.

If you feel you are losing the position, underhook the head and switch back to 100 kilos putting good side pressure down and in to him.

Good Luck.>

Post: Tapout95:

Sorry, I knew I was confused. I knew I had seen something like this before. http://www.bjj.org/techniques/intheguard/crossmount/ Thats why I thought it could be reversed.[/url >

Post: Tapout95:

oh shit, sorry. I posted too late I guess. Sorry for the repeat. And Thanks for the clarification. That helps me to understand alot.>

Post: Tease T Tickle:

I like that 100 kilos position, but in the picture I can’t see what the left arm is doing. Is it scooping like you mentioned for the cross body mount or is it checking with the elbow like I was doing? Also, how do you feel about hooking a leg from side control?

Thanks a bunch, Bushi!>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Tease T Tickle I like that 100 kilos position, but in the picture I can’t see what the left arm is doing. Is it scooping like you mentioned for the cross body mount or is it checking with the elbow like I was doing? Also, how do you feel about hooking a leg from side control?

Thanks a bunch, Bushi![/quote 

What exactly do you mean by hooking the leg? I do not want to assume anything.

Oh and you are welcome :)>

Post: Tapout95:

Yeah. I understand what you are saying. By shifting yourself up more into the north/south position and controlling his right arm, you are putting more pressure down on his upper torso, while removing his ability to grab at you as well. He can bridge all he wants to, but he won’t have the type of power, control, or flexibilty to do anything he wants to. He’ll just be flopping around like a fish. Meanwhile, you’re pounding in his face with elbows. Is this right?>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Tapout95 Yeah. I understand what you are saying. By shifting yourself up more into the north/south position and controlling his right arm, you are putting more pressure down on his upper torso, while removing his ability to grab at you as well. He can bridge all he wants to, but he won’t have the type of power, control, or flexibilty to do anything he wants to. He’ll just be flopping around like a fish. Meanwhile, you’re pounding in his face with elbows. Is this right?[/quote 

Yep!>

Post: Sparky-bjj:

Hi Bushi,

I have another question:). This time about the ‘knee pinch’ or ‘knee slicer’ of whatever you wanna call it. I sometimes try this submission but almost nobody taps out for it. I know (or think…) that it’s supposed to seriously hurt the muscles around the knee, but all it does is hurt a little. Is this technique supposed to just hurt a little or is it actually capable of doing some serious damage if you don’t tap out to it? Then I must be doing something wrong, but I just don’t know what…>

Post: Bushi:

I believe you are referring to the “Calf Slicer” or “Leg Slicer”. The problem with this submission is similar to the Heel Hook, once you feel the pain the damage is probably done. They are slowly disallowing this submission in tournaments due to its destructive nature to the knee. We have had two high level guys need knee surgery because they got caught with this sub in comps. and their opponents blasted through it, by the time they tapped, both tore their meniscus.

When doing the calf slicer ensure that the lower part of you shin is all the way up behind their knee before using their leg as a nut cracker. The nut cracker analogy helps me understand how to use this sub. I position the last 3 part of my shin behind their knee and pull their knee closed at their ankle, getting maximum leverage. These subs work better on people with defined Hamstring muscles it seems. The pain is a compression lock similar to a bicep slicer.

Keep in mind, I have one set-up in mind, but there are numerous ways to hit this sub from offensive a defensive positions. Here is one that is a little complex, but good. I like the variation better.

http://www.lockflow.com/article_view.php?id=391

Enjoy

*Edited for clarity*>

Post: Sparky-bjj:

thanx again.>

Post: Tease T Tickle:

[quote=Bushi What exactly do you mean by hooking the leg? I do not want to assume anything.

Oh and you are welcome :)[/quote 
By hooking the leg, I mean wrapping my arm around one of my opponent’s leg and elevating it off the mat. Sort of like a WWE pin or as if I’m setting up for a kneebar. Instead of asking what you think of it as a set up to some other technique, I’m interested more in what control aspects this might have. I think that it helps to prevent bridging since they only have one foot to support themselves as they lift up, but my groundgame is the last thing I want to mess up by basing it all on my own limited experience.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Tease T Tickle [quote=Bushi What exactly do you mean by hooking the leg? I do not want to assume anything.

Oh and you are welcome :)[/quote 
By hooking the leg, I mean wrapping my arm around one of my opponent’s leg and elevating it off the mat. Sort of like a WWE pin or as if I’m setting up for a kneebar. Instead of asking what you think of it as a set up to some other technique, I’m interested more in what control aspects this might have. I think that it helps to prevent bridging since they only have one foot to support themselves as they lift up, but my groundgame is the last thing I want to mess up by basing it all on my own limited experience.[/quote 

I thought thats what you meant, but I did not want to waste time with a long explanation and I be wrong.

I use that under hook to control them in short bursts. If I start to lose them do to active hips, I will stabalize them with that underhook. I do not use it like Judo does however. The reason being an experienced grappler can catch you in an inverted triangle choke if you are not careful. So, stay high up under the knee as opposed to their hip.

Judo version: http://www.linkopingjudo.org/gradering/half_orange/Kuzure-yoko-shiho-gatame.jpg

I use the leg hook when I am passing the guard as well. (If passing to my right) I will pin their left knee down with my right hand and underhook their right leg with my left. My right ear is on their right hip. I sprawl and step around the downed leg to pass while lifting their right leg up and keeping their hips down with my head pressure on the hip.

Now if you are talking about lifting their near knee off the ground, well I see that in aiding them to roll over the opposite shoulder to do a belly down escape. That is unless you have their head overhooked in this fashion: (just look at the overhook)

http://sports.luther.edu/albums/wrestling/Hansen_vs_ON_Pin.sized.jpg

with the overhook I think you will create enough cross body pressure to prevent the roll away. Now you could use his roll away to set up taking his back, but you would have to scramble fast once he goes before he gets to this poisiton

http://berkswebs.com/wrestling2004/images/prac12_9/23.jpg

sorry about the pictures, its the best I could find. :cry:>

Post: Tease T Tickle:

why apologize? I ask for pointers and get a training manual! Thanks, Bushi, it’s much appreciated.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Tease T Tickle why apologize? I ask for pointers and get a training manual! Thanks, Bushi, it’s much appreciated.[/quote 

Your Welcome. This thread is alot of fun keep them coming.>

Post: zefff:

I know it sounds awful but I am really worried about profiteering.

I have been practicing for nearly 6 months and have been informed that I am eligible for blue belt. My game is coming on and I can sub a few blue belts after tightening up the details on the very limited number of subs I have in my reportoire. My passing, sweeps and positional play have come on a lot too in the last few weeks now I am focused on that.

The thing is I dont think I am ready. I see blues who have good gi control, spider guards, de la rivas and all kinds of stuff that I just dont employ at all. Their sweeps are awesome and they know a lot of escapes while I am still getting my triangles down.

Now, the belt will be earned on a mass grading day and will cost me. I explained to my instructors that I dont feel anywhere near ready and I dont want to do it but they say dont worry. Ive never had a grading in my life so maybe thats the problem but I thought you were just given a belt one day out of the blue?…so to speak. Anyway Ive got a hip injury at the mo so I will probably skip a month and miss the grading. Is 6 months of 3 times a week about right for progression to blue?>

Post: setsu nin to:

I know that its Ask Bushi topic, but here are just my 2 cents. Sorry Bushi. I leave technical part to Bushi, I would just like to say that belt color doesnt mean much, its important in some way, but it doesnt prove your skills or technical level or are you good fighter or not. Of course that if you get blue belt tomorrow your skills wont be same as skills of blue belt who will become purple belt in two days, same as your skills as white belt are not same as skills of someone who become white belt yesterday. Take your belt and work hard to prove that you deserve it. Good luck!>

Post: Bushi:

When I got my Blue Belt, I did not feel I deserved it either. In our Academies there are no gradings. If you are a Blue belt someone will eventually just give you one. I like that system. Hell, anyone can bone up for a test. Not to mention some guys will let the stress get to them on test day and perform like crap even though on an average day the would be locked on. I say go to the grading, but go in the same way you would go to class. Go with the expectation to learn something and not earn something and I think you will do fine. Whatever happens will happen.

Good luck let me know how it goes.

PS. I got mine in 6 months at 3 days a week :wink:>

Post: zefff:

Thanks guys,

I would rather just be given a belt but its only 20 pounds…then another 20 pounds to join BTT officially. :roll:

I dont care about rank at all and will continue to attack and learn from anyone with a higher rank or bodyweight…its just the hunch that it is a profit making scheme. I guess business’ have to make money though eh?

TBH I dont think I will be fit to take the grading as Im not in classes now anyway but I look forward to sandbagging newbs in class when I return! Mwuhuhahahahaa!!!

Edit: I was just about fit enough to go but I had to help my in-laws move house so I missed out. Seeing the pics of my mates with their shiny new blue belts I must admit I am a little sorry for myself.>

Post: irishpowerhouse77:

Do you feel that $160 a month is a good price for a 1 yr contract for a BJJ school?>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=irishpowerhouse77 Do you feel that $160 a month is a good price for a 1 yr contract for a BJJ school?[/quote 

NO. I think that is Highway robbery. I charge 75 a month for 3 days a week and 100 for unlimited. I only pay 100 for three days a week with a well known team of 6 BBs. That is just crazy. Have you shopped around?>

Post: irishpowerhouse77:

It’s the school I messaged you about. W/ the red belt and a few bb’s. Theres another place in my area, but the instructor is not as experienced and is only like 20 bucks a month cheaper. 160 unlimited can be as much as 10 classes a week… god knows I wont have that much time though.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=irishpowerhouse77 It’s the school I messaged you about. W/ the red belt and a few bb’s. Theres another place in my area, but the instructor is not as experienced and is only like 20 bucks a month cheaper. 160 unlimited can be as much as 10 classes a week… god knows I wont have that much time though.[/quote 

Well it is NY (pricey, pricey) and I guess I missed where it was unlimited. If its unlimited, thats not that bad. Plus you will be training with GM Mansur.>

Post: Stg:

[quote=irishpowerhouse77 It’s the school I messaged you about. W/ the red belt and a few bb’s. Theres another place in my area, but the instructor is not as experienced and is only like 20 bucks a month cheaper. 160 unlimited can be as much as 10 classes a week… god knows I wont have that much time though.[/quote 

you’re talking about ronin athletics i assume? if so then, contrary to another post i made about 3 months ago, you get your money’s worth there. i’ve been training there for about a year and i’ve been to other schools, ronin is pretty much the best overall one in nyc. i mean you COULD go to renzo’s place, but it’s only gi bjj(and no gi AFTER you become a blue belt, and only once a week), ronin has gi bjj, no-gibjj, mt, boxing, wrestling- complete mma training.

sorry for sounding like an advertisment :P>

Post: Stg:

i just thought of something. could you please clarify how to defend the darcy? i hate that fucking move!!!>

Post: bamboo:

Also a verification question for you Bushi.

To clarify my ground stuff sucks but I have made some observations as of late that I’m hoping you can tell me if its crap or not. Its all about the arm bar from the guard. I’m “starting fresh” and assuming nothing so please excuse my noobie observations.

1. Its really important to slide the hips at right angles to your opponent so as to help create freedom of movement of the leg when responding.

2.the leg nearest the head must be over the throat to help prevent the guy from just sitting up.

3.You have to shift your hips in the opposite direction of the arm when the opponent is twisting the arm out.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=bamboo Also a verification question for you Bushi.

To clarify my ground stuff sucks but I have made some observations as of late that I’m hoping you can tell me if its crap or not. Its all about the arm bar from the guard. I’m “starting fresh” and assuming nothing so please excuse my noobie observations.

1. Its really important to slide the hips at right angles to your opponent so as to help create freedom of movement of the leg when responding.

2.the leg nearest the head must be over the throat to help prevent the guy from just sitting up.

3.You have to shift your hips in the opposite direction of the arm when the opponent is twisting the arm out.[/quote 

I am having problems following your question. I’m sure it is me and not you, so I’ll just go into major detail about Armbar from guard.

Armbar from Guard (Closed).

1. Pick an arm (From instructional purposes “the right”one)
2. Reach across and OVER with your right hand and grab his right tricep.
a. With a shell hand (thumb along the fingers) imagine pulling his tricep around to his bicep.
b. The downward spiral pull across his arm will hold it in place.
3. Put your left foot on his right hip
a. Use the push with the side of your left leg on his right arm to assist pulling his right arm across your stomach.
b. His arm is in position when his right elbow is over your belly button
c. The downward pull of your right arm and the power of your left leg moves his right arm into position.
4. Place your left hand on the left side of his neck.
a. This will control him posturing away. Use the left hand as a meat hook.
5. Curl your right calf under his left armpit pulling his left shoulder closer to you.
a. This curling in conjunction with the other moves pulls your body perpendicular to him and places his right arm down your center line for you to swing your left leg over his head.
6. Be sure to enlongate his right arm by push his right hip away from his right arm.
7. Remain tight and swing your left leg over his head with the back of your left knee on the back f his neck.
8. Hold the arm tight with your twisting down right arm and lift you hips for the lock.

Let me know if this helps.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=Stg i just thought of something. could you please clarify how to defend the darcy? i hate that fucking move!!![/quote 

What do you know the Darcy to be? I haven’t heard anything called the Darcy.>

Post: Stg:

it’s a modified arm triange from half guard top/turtle position top, jason miller does it. i think it’s also called a brabo choke.

joa rogan does it here at the 53 second mark: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a556pUcVgO0

but it can also be done from half guard top when the guy on bottom underhooks you>

Post: Bushi:

Oh Okay, The Brabo.

I simply do not rotate on my side when I feel someone going for it. I flatten out. That and do not let them press your arm across your face and lay on it. Anything can be defeated in its set up by making them focus on something else. Example. If I am going for a Kimura from guard and the guy defends I switch to the hip bump sweep only to free the kimura up.

Edit: Here is a Gi version that is complex, but pretty cool. The Brabo is more of the cross collar choke variation. Click on Sample.

http://www.fightlife.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=24&products_id=234>

Post: Sparky-bjj:

Hi Bushi,

I wanted to ask you about a certain technique. Specifically the ‘nightmare choke’. I had never heard of this choke, but I heard some guy talking about it at a competition. What is this choke? I’ve looked it up on the internet but couldn’t find many things. Is it choking the guy with one arm over his throat and with the other arm closing of his mouth and nose so he can’t breath? Or is it something else? Thanx for your time!>

Post: Bushi:

The Nightmare choke is anytime you put your hand over someones mouth and nose closing off their ability to breathe. I’ve seen it done two different ways.

1. Like the rear naked face down on someones back hooks in, but instead of putting your hand behind their head it covers their mouth.

2. From the mount position, its like a Fist choke but the hand covers the mouth, instead of pressing into their windpipe.

Is that what you were looking for?>

Post: Sparky-bjj:

yeah, thanx again!

But now that I’m asking questions I have another one. I recently participated in a grappling tournament and I lost one of my matches to a straight ankle lock. I think the main problem was that when he went for the straight ankle lock, I was trying to go for the heelhook instead of trying to get up and improve my position. I couldn’t catch his heel. I tried to get up when he started cranking it but he pushed me back down with his other leg and it was too late. Do you know a good way of defending the straight ankle lock? I know you’re supposed to put in your leg as deep as possible so he can’t hyperextend your foot, but don’t you give away a toe hold when you do this? Also if you were in this situation, would you have immeditaly tried to escape or would you have gone for the heelhook first, like I did? Thanx again!>

Post: Bushi:

My best defense for the straight ankle lock is awareness. When in vunerable positions, I always anticipate that my opponent will go for a leg submission. This causes me to react and not give them any chance of setting one up.

If they fall back for the straight ankle, I immediately come up to my foot and grab their lapel or back of the neck with the opposite hand to the trapped ankle. The same side hand to the trapped ankle will fight off their wrap around foot.

If they managed to get my foot locked down, I curl my trapped foot back hard (toes to knee) and fight to the second position I mentioned. If I feel the lock is loose or they haven’t completely locked it down yet I may roll toward the foot to loosen it more, but that is my last choice.

I never play footsy at the 50/50 position to see who gets the lock first. It is just to risky, because you basically gave up on your highest percentage move. The Escape.

Does that help?>

Post: dscott:

Bushi: How does the anaconda choke work? I’ve seen Nog use it against Heath Herring and I just loved the look of it. It actually looked like an anaconda wrapping himself around the neck.>

Post: Bushi:

It is a Blood choke similar to the Arm Triangle. The opponent’s shoulder cuts off one side and your arm the other.>

Post: Sparky-bjj:

Quote:
I never play footsy at the 50/50 position to see who gets the lock first. It is just to risky, because you basically gave up on your highest percentage move. The Escape.

Does that help?

Yeah, that helps. I tried to go for the heelhook because it’s a more dangerous submission than the straight ankle lock and I thought he would tap first. Maybe if I went for position instead of submission I would have escaped. But I just love not caring about your position and flying for the submission. That’s my submission grappling attitude who is bigger than my bjj attitude. I usually don’t worry that much about my position. I even try to go for submission when I’m mounted (the heelhook!). It works a lot since it catches opponents off guard. But maybe I should indeed worry more about my position. I only practice bjj and submission grappling, but all my favorite fighters (sakuraba, imanari, tokoro, minowa, sato, sudo) have this catch wrestling thing going on (maybe not genki) and i basically try to imitate them :) (escpecially imanari)Oh well, better luck next time. Thanx again for your reply!>

Post: zefff:

Is it worth learning and developing my Jiu Jitsu rules rolling (positions for points) and how can I expect it to impact on my overall training?

i.e. Will it increase real world applicable skill or does it take one even further from reality and so risk me training with delusion?

I hope that makes sense but what Im essentially asking is should I just roll with real world ‘self defence’ application in mind or should I roll more with the points in mind? Basically what is the benfit of playing the game?…I think I know but I want you to tell me. :)

Sorry for the crappily constructed post.>

Post: dscott:

Is there a difference between an Americana and a Kimura?>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=zefff Is it worth learning and developing my Jiu Jitsu rules rolling (positions for points) and how can I expect it to impact on my overall training?

i.e. Will it increase real world applicable skill or does it take one even further from reality and so risk me training with delusion?

I hope that makes sense but what Im essentially asking is should I just roll with real world ‘self defence’ application in mind or should I roll more with the points in mind? Basically what is the benfit of playing the game?…I think I know but I want you to tell me. :)

Sorry for the crappily constructed post.[/quote 

I always roll with points in mind. The point system for the most part was to reward a practioner with superior position which is better in a real fight. Think about it, the only points awarded to guard (a bottom position) is for a sweep, which puts you in a better position for striking and or escaping. The top position. The only points that do not make a whole lot of sense from a SD position is Back mount (Face up) hooks in and the takedown. The takedown more so, but BJJ has to reward people for doing BJJ and you can’t really do that on your feet.

As far as your emphasis, well I say train different ways at different times. If you want to have more of a SD emphasis one day practice sweeps from the guard instead of subs and pass the guard with the understanding of pounding the guy out (in your head) or going to Knee on stomach from side control.

Also, I think Knee on stomach is probably the best BJJ position for SD. You have the best of both worlds. You are not standing, but you are not really engaged in a ground fight. You can go into grappling or you can stand and stomp or run. Would you agree? This also reinforces my position on points , since Knee on Stomach is rewarded, at least in the GI.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=dscott Is there a difference between an Americana and a Kimura?[/quote 

Yes, but they are both known as Ude Garami in Judo/JJJ and both can also be called a Keylock.

The difference. The Americana is when their arm is pointing up and the Kimura is when it is pointing down. This is the most widely used terminology of the locks.

Keep in mind that the Carlos side of the Family refers to the upward Keylock as Franciasa (French Armbar) and the Kimura as Americana. This is due to the Carlos side not Honoring M. Kimura for breaking Helios arm with the downward keylock. This may be what has contributed to the confusion.

I hope that helps.>

Post: zefff:

Critique my vid!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vmZGjk_RSk>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=zefff Critique my vid!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vmZGjk_RSk[/quote 

I would be honored to. I would like to first state that any criticism I give is constructive and should be taken as such. I appreciate you letting me do this and I applaud your courage. Here we go.

The initial guard pass you used was good. You settled into side control well and seemed to establish your weight.

00:30 You went to KOS. This was a good move, but there was a very good opportunity to spin to the other side for the armbar. When the opponent pushes on your knee and creates that triangle with his left arm, you should reach in and grab his tricep with your right arm and spin to the far-side armbar.

00:36 You transitioned to mount and that was good, but you transitioned because he underhooked your left leg with his right arm. This was a perfect time to swing that leg up to his neck to set up the mounted triangle.

00:50 You tried setting up the Americana on his right arm which was good, but you did not settle your right side down which would have made it hard for him to roll you. You could have also Grapevined his left leg with your right and it would have taken away his leverage for the upa. Keep in mind to fight for your positions. It seemed you were content to be rolled.

00:55 You were open guard and attempted a Chest to Chest sweep, but I think your did not come up onto your right hand, but were probably on your right elbow (out of view), that and you have to raise your hips above your opponents when doing this sweep. Your thighs then create a gate. Also, when you feel this sweep fail do to lack of leverage, abandon it immediately and go back to a closed guard. Once you felt him go for your back, get your back to the mat fast and pull to at least half-guard.

00:59 He was on your back with no hooks. You were content with his right forarm being around your throat. When someone puts their arm into RNC position immediately address it. You tried to get to a table top position while he took forever to sink the choke. He did not have hooks, so you could have horse bucked him forward and ended in North South.

01:28 You guys started on your knees. You are sitting on your heals, either get up like he starts or post one foot up and one knee down. This allows you to react if he rushes forward. He did not in this case, but could have.

01:35 He pulls to a Butterfly guard and you lay on him. When someone pulls to the hook guard, posture up and work back and away from his hooks. He wants you in so he can feel your movement and lift you. If you stay right out side and try controlling his legs this is a difficult position for him.

01:45 He takes a long time and slowly closes his guard. If the opportunity presents itself, never let a guy close his guard both Gi and No-gi. If you watch High level guys, they fight to get to closed guard. New guys let it happen. Never let someone close their guard. When its open, posture and put a knee in. (One knee up, one knee down sitting on your foot)

01:56 He pulls your head down. Keep your posture when in the guard. Look at him with your eyes, not your head. Head up, eyes down. If you put the hands in his biceps, that is for a stand up pass, otherwise pressure his hips and keep your head behind your hands, so he does not break you down. I tell my guys “Superman”. What that means is posture back and away while pushing his floating ribs into his chest and Watch for armbars.

02:08 You stand in his guard and he underhooks your left leg with his right arm. Go back down to a knee, trapping his right arm in-between your calf and thigh. There are different pass set ups from there, not to mention you have your base back.

02:16 He has this hybrid scissor guard thing going with the right arm underhook. His guard is ripe for the double underhook pass. Take both your arms and underhook his legs and stack him for the pass.

02:35 He is back in closed guard. Spread your knees out sit on your feet and establish posture. You ride really high and are vulnerable to being broken down or swepted.

02:50 He is riding his legs up high in closed guard. Push his chin up and posture back. Also prior, you put your hands on the mat. Keep them on him and push his hips. You allow his hips to much movement. The key to guard is mobile hips, cut that off and you will see things develop.

03:12 You pop up to stand and pass, Very Good. He goes for the right underhook, big deal. Once again his guard is open, go for the double unders pass.

03:15 You are tryin to pass to your left. Instead of leaning over, thrust your hips forward drive them into his legs and use your hands to shed and pass the legs.

03:23 You get tripod swept, but next time fight back up, do not settle for the sweep. If done right, he will not be able to come to the top.

03:30 He is leaning over with his hands on the mat, he is asking for all kinds of set-ups. Open your guard and post your feet in the hips for armbars and you could have set up the Kimura, since his hands were on the mat.

03:43 You Chest to Chest sweep. Good. If you notice, your hips were higher than his and you were up on your hand. SEE!!!! LOL

03:51 You have mount. Walk your knees up under his armpits if you want to sit up mount as opposed to grapevine mount. It makes it hard for him to Bridge, since you are not sitting on his hips, but his chest. You are on his hips and give him the leverage for the bridge.

04:18 You think about going to the armbar when he bucks. If you were higher on his chest it would be there. That and if you just went for it. The armbar was there, sometimes you just have to go for it.

04:33 He upas you off to his right. You were to top heavy and over commited to your left. This is proven by the fact that he did not off balance you forward at first, but just barrell rolled you. If you feel that buck, grapevine your right leg quick to steal his leverage.

05:07 He has you in half-guard. I cannot see anything but your trapped leg. I saw you trying to push his knee down. You have to walk your right foot up to his butt. Walk the foot alternating heal to toe, heal to toe until it gets under his butt. This puts your knee in position so you can then push his guard off the knee. When your leg is extended like that, then the push on his knee is pretty useless.

05:28 You get swept, but re-sweep back into his half-guard. You chose to stand in it. Good Choice. He tries playing open guard, but you hesitate and he goes to his knees. When someone has Open guard, keep pressure on them with one leg in, one leg out. Use your shin and thrust your hips forward. Keep him on his back and play with his feet for the pass set-up. Inactivity leads to his activity.

05:41 He tries tp pull to closed guard, but you pin his right leg down with your left forearm, GOOD. Next time, immediately replace your left forearm with your left shin for the pass.

05:50 He finally gets closed guard and you lay over him. Remember to POSTURE, POSTURE, POSTURE. You stand GOOD. He opens the guard and you put a knee in, Very GOOD. You have to shed the grips he has on your wrists. Do not let anyone control your hands, you need those. Circle them out and then attack his legs for the pass.

06:11 You almost seemed to go for the “Knee Through” pass. This was a good instinct, and next time go with it. It was there. Just remember to have the right arm underhooking his left arm (In this case) so he doesn’t take your back during the pass. Next Time.

06:26 He sweeps you with a psuedo-scissor sweep. Your base was to narrow, if your knees were down and your base was wide it probably would have failed and you really settled for the sweep. Fight the sweep to the end.

06:40 You are in guard. Either close it or put your feet in his hips. Having your feet on the ground with out some sort of attack sequence is asking for a headstand pass or a Double leg pass. Post your feet in his hips and keep your hip mobile, looking for attacks. If you do not like him just laying on you push his head to one side or the other. He will react.

06:50 You go for a Kimura, but your feet were down, not defending the pass. He does the right thing and passes, but you extend up and finish. This will not work on an experienced grappler. He will either spin around your head for an armbar (I’ll see if I can find a video of this counter) or go to knee on chest to take the pressure off. If not those two, an experienced grappler will roll himself over you giving you the dominate position, but not get tapped like that.

Overall, you did well. Keep up the good work and work on those things I mentioned and you will see a totally different exchange take place. Once again, I appaud you for posting this. I feel honored that you allowed me to criticize it. I hope you take my criticism as constructive and not as bashing, because I can tell you are training, and there were alot of good things in there that I did not mention, since I wanted to get to the corrections.

Have fun and let me know if that is what you were looking for.>

Post: zefff:

Yes thats great! Thanks for your efforts. I will pick through all that and work on the details. I hear you on the counters too but on the mat my mind is very much stuck in the present, looking at whats happening rather than what I can make happen. Will definitely remember the spin to armbar from KOS though.

thanks a lot!

edit: Thanks Bushi, I am going through it now for the second time and the pointers are excellent. I am very grateful because in class I must admit I put more effort into protecting my position and am a lot more competitive so all I seem to hear is Del you are very strong and doing well etc. unless I make serious mistakes. This critique of yours is so good Bushi I am hoping it wont be the last.

edit 2: The critique was so good I am gonna try and take a vid of sparring in gi tonight. A lot of effort went into that PBP and I really do appreciate it.

Thank you very much!>

Post: zefff:

Here is one with me vs my mate who forgot his gi. We are both white belts with about 7 months of BJJ and weigh about the same 185lbs. You dont have to go into huge depth on this one if you dont want but please pick up on key points as I just decided I am going to compete in a national comp (adcc rules) in only 20 days time.

Many thanks!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vHBA5UtvFE>

Post: Bushi:

Zefff

Overall, I see a lot more confidence in your rolling. Has this been consistent in your training since the last video I critiqued? You are passing the guard well, but could be attacking more once you are passed. Find two or three attacks once you get into a dominant position and fire back and forth through them until something gives. If you only have one attack going, it is easy for your opponent to counter, but if you are constantly attacking a couple of different things, they slip up. Remember attacks are not only sub attempts, but can be transitions to more dominant positions or controlling grips. Think of it like striking high low, left and right. Things happen when you strike right?

Once again, I was impressed with your improvement. I can see that you are trying some of the things that I suggested. Do you find them working out?

The only real problem I saw was you getting rolled early on in the footage. I could not see what happened, but I will assume you got over extended and he lift and rolled you. Remember to cut your hips into the mat. Think about f-ing the mat. It helps. Also when you get to side control, pop up to Knee on stomach immediately. (You did this later in the footage and it took the life out of your opponent) Knee on stomach is like a chisel, it slowly breaks your opponent down. If you practice it enough, you can ride for a while and your opponents will eventually just give you subs to get you off of them. Knee on stomach is like money in the bank. It is an investment that pays off when your opponent gases.

Once again, good job and WATCH YOUR BASE. :)

I would have critiqued it like the first, but I could not see the fine details like in the first video. I hope the above was sufficient.>

Post: zefff:

Many thanks!

Quote:
I see a lot more confidence in your rolling. Has this been consistent in your training since the last video I critiqued?

Yes it helped A LOT but to be honest sometimes I chill out and let things go and other times I am more up for it and fight a bit more. My vids have all been against equal(ish) skilled and sized white belts but when I roll with guys who have more skill/experience/strength than me I am a lot more aggressive and/or a lot more careful not to give things away. I dont know if it shows but in these vids Im not trying to totally dominate my opponent and shut him down.

Quote:
you are passing the guard well, but could be attacking more once you are passed. Find two or three attacks once you get into a dominant position and fire back and forth through them until something gives. If you only have one attack going, it is easy for your opponent to counter, but if you are constantly attacking a couple of different things, they slip up. Remember attacks are not only sub attempts, but can be transitions to more dominant positions or controlling grips.

That sounds like a great idea! I will try it out and see what happens. I noticed another guy in my vid doing that where he sets up a good high position for armbar then goes for something else to distract him, then back to the armbar to finish.

Quote:
I can see that you are trying some of the things that I suggested. Do you find them working out?

Yes, especially from my back regarding what you said about my inactivity leads to his activity and not resting my feet down in an open guard. My armbar and triangle success rate has increased immediately!…at the least I am seeing more opportunities for them anyway. Also the underhook legs for guard pass, KOS stuff and not getting drawn into peoples butterfly guard has really helped.

Thank you very much!>

Post: Steelcowboy:

Hey Bushi. This is a great thread. I spent plenty of time going over your critique of the videos (Thanks for posting zefff). I’d like to hear some of your favorite moves and guiding principles for just face-to-face starting on knees.>

Post: Bushi:

I’ll do you one better.

I will post my Gameplan.

I will post the three moves I am “thinking of/ seting up” from each of the major positions. The set ups may not make sense, because they are names I learned or made up. They do give you an indication of what you are doing though.

Closed Guard Subs
1) Triangle- Shin press set-up or Push pull set-up
2) Armbar- High guard walk over set-up or Cross arm set up
3) Kimura- Standard arm dive or Arm hug set-up

Closed Guard Sweeps
1) Chest to Chest
2) Flower sweep
3) Scissor

Guard Passes
1) Double Under
2) Over/ Under
3) Knee Through (Dukes of Hazzard)

Half-guard Sweeps
1) Single Leg/ Old School
2) Indiana Jones (my term)
3) Shin Lever

Half-Guard Passes
1) Marcelo #1
2) Double Leg
3) Head Hug Mount

Mount Subs
1) Gomi (Triangle)
2) Arm bar- Upa Counter or Americana grip set-up
3) Cross collar

Mount Escapes
1) Upa
2) Hook to Half-guard
3) Hip Press

Side Control Transition
1) Straddle mount
2) Knee Drive
3) Knee on Stomach over

Knee on Stomach Subs
1) Baseball Choke
2) Spin Armbar
3) Kimura

Side Control Escapes
1) Hip escape
2) Belly Down
3) Cork Screw

Back Attacks
1) RNC
2) Single Wing choke
3) Armbar (kimura grip)

Back mount escapes
1) Butt Slide
2) Under hook leg spin
3) Nick Diaz roll

Butterfly Guard sweeps
1) Hook sweep
2) Arm drag
3) Sit up/through

As you can see, I have a very basic game. Now understand, I add new things, but the above is my bread and butter. As far as starting on your knees, make sure you control the centerline through effective grip fighting. Pull guard if you like, or make him do it. If he does DO NOT LET HIM GET TO CLOSED GUARD. Set your pass up as soon as he pulls.

Please let me know if posting my gameplan helps you guys.>

Post: zefff:

THIS IS AWESOME!!!!>

Post: Steelcowboy:

That’s great man. I wish I was familiar with a few more of those terms. If you want to go into some of those a little more that would be sweet. Guess I’ll start at the bottom…I’m not familiar with any of the half guard sweep/subs terminology. Care to divulge?>

Post: Bushi:

I really didn’t post this suggesting you mimic my game. I posted it to give you an understanding of how to create a game. If you did try to implement my game, that wouldn’t be a bad thing, but it may not fit your body type or how you naturally flow. I suggest you guys (not saying that wasn’t what you were going to do) use it as a guide to developing a plan that is YOU specific.

I would be happy to go into or post techniques for your questions, but lets take them one at a time.>

Post: Steelcowboy:

Hey Bushi,

I’d just like to clarify a couple of those terms so I can understand your strat a little better. Not so much for mimicking your game. For the greater majority I understand what you’re talking about. Like my game for a closed guard involved more omoplatas and “side door” manoeuvers for taking the back. Reading one of your posts on the pull/push triangles got me into pulling them again. I think that’s interesting you pin up the triangle as one of your top 3 attacks from the mount. I’d like to see how that works for me.>

Post: Stg:

bushi- when you begin to roll with someone, and they start from the position where they are kind of on thier backs to immediately looks for sweeps instead of starting from thier knees, what’s the best way to approach them to work your game without getting sucked into thier sweeping game?>

Post: Bushi:

There is a couple of things you can do. 1) You can put a knee up in between their legs. This is where you have your foot on the ground under their butt and your behind that knee while slightly sitting on your other knee behind you. This makes it impossible for them to go closed guard and they are forced to use a hook type guard like De la Riva.
2) The other thing and this is a good rule of thumb anyway is to control their legs when in ther open guard. You can pin their legs to the mat or raise them into a stack to pass. There is also combinations of pin and stack. The key with either is control their hips via their legs this is the secret to passing any guard.

But remember most of all DO NOT LET THEM GET TO CLOSED GUARD. That is like wasting the opportunity they gave you.>

Post: bamboo:

A few times I’ve caught someone in yoko shiho gatame but before I transition to a better position I’ve been caught up in what I think is sankaku gatame (triangle).

Now, I know to keep the majority of my weight on uke’s shoulder and when I do its never a problem, its the few times when I stupidly go for a sub from the side instead of establishing a better base.

So my question(s) to you Bushi are:

1. How does one pull off a triangle when held in yoko shiho gatame (side hold?)
2. How to stop this.

Cheers,

Bamboo>

Post: zefff:

A simple one from me.

I am a total newbie at sparring wrestling/submissions from standup and what Ive noticed is I am holding my breath at times. With striking Im cool because I breath out when I strike but without strikes I dont have any cues for breathing. Any suggestions?>

Post: Bushi:

Just like striking, focus on the exhale. The inhale will take care of itself. I do this blow out every now and again it becomes part of my routine. Think about how you would quickly blow out a candle or a match, but do it like 3 times rapidly every now and then. I also use it to fake out my opponents, because when they hear it, they think I am going for an explosive movement, which I am not.

I hope that helps.>

Post: Bushi:

[quote=bamboo A few times I’ve caught someone in yoko shiho gatame but before I transition to a better position I’ve been caught up in what I think is sankaku gatame (triangle).

Now, I know to keep the majority of my weight on uke’s shoulder and when I do its never a problem, its the few times when I stupidly go for a sub from the side instead of establishing a better base.

So my question(s) to you Bushi are:

1. How does one pull off a triangle when held in yoko shiho gatame (side hold?)
2. How to stop this.

Cheers,

Bamboo[/quote 

They only way for them to pull off the triangle from that side control position is if you put one of your arms inside their legs. With your arm inside, they just explosively push your head down and swing their legs up around your arm and head to get the triangle. If you no this is an option for them and you do not let your arm get suckered in between their legs it becomes impossible for them to hit that move. I also keep my head glued down, since the have to get their thigh on my neck.

Try different side controls beside the Yoko Shiho. I rarely use the that traditional hold, because for the most part it is good for pinning, but not for transitioning or setting up subs. Let me know if you need more, I can go into way more detail.>

Post: bamboo:

Thanks Bushi,

Now that you point it out it is exactly as you stated, when my inside arm is under the leg, usually due to the throw.

Quote:
Try different side controls beside the Yoko Shiho

I know, I’m just hardheaded when it comes to “different”. :lol:

Will do.

Again, my thanks for this thread.

Its great stuff and I like the way you describe things, very easy to follow.

Cheers,

bamboo

Edit- LOL, I just saw a thread at Bullshido asking the same question. Guess there are more ground noobs around than just me!>

Post: Bushi:

How is everyone’s game coming along? Any new goals or road blocks?

I won two Gold medals in December. Woohoo!!

Later.>

Post: zefff:

Congratulations!

My goal is to get back into training ASAP as I cant afford the classes right now :-(>

Post: bamboo:

Bushi- Could I get a critique on my vid?

cheers,

bamboo>

Post: Bushi:

Love to…where’s it at?>

Post: bamboo:

Under the post below called “feel free to critique”
http://www.fightauthority.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=4593

cheers. :D>

Post: Bushi:

Done my friend. Good job.>

Post: The BadBoy:

Hey Bushi,

I’m having some trouble with being stacked when I try an armbar from guard. Any counters to being stacked that might help would be greatly appreciated.>

Post: Stg:

to badboy’s question: you can grab the person’s ankle and roll them over into an armbar from side mount but i dunno how to explain it without showing it :/ you can also grab the leg and kind of like, scoot your body out so you end up in an inverted armbar like the one nog used on cro cop, hopefully bushi can explain what i mean better>

Post: Bushi:

There is a couple of things you can do.

1) Underhook their near leg and sweep them to their back in the direction of their trapped arm’s shoulder. Basically turning it into an armbar sweep. Then finish the armbar.

2) Underhook their far leg and pull yourself underneath their crotch. This twisting of their torso will either cause them to fall thus creating number 1) or you will rotate to the inverted armbar STG spoke of.

3)Underhook their near leg and do a Flower sweep.

4)Let them stack and pull the arm out while you set up and switch to Oma Plata

Try some of those. I think you will find some success.>

Post: opariser1001:

Bushi, i made a thread about Rubber Guard, please check it out! I would like to hear your thoughts on it, but thought it deserved its own thread>

Post: Bushi:

Roger that>

Post: The BadBoy:

Hi Bushi, trying out the tips and having soem success with methods 1 & 4. Question on the Omaplata. I can get the Omaplata and am quite successful is using it as a control position but have trouble in finishing it. Any tips?

Also some advice on no gi chokes would be greatly appreciated.

On a side note my BJJ Black Belt buddy is back in the country. Will be training with him on saturday so gonna drive him insane with questions :)>

Post: Bushi:

Quoting: The BadBoy;48185 Hi Bushi, trying out the tips and having soem success with methods 1 & 4. Question on the Omaplata. I can get the Omaplata and am quite successful is using it as a control position but have trouble in finishing it. Any tips?

Make sure you end up perpendicular to your opponent. Flat on your back. Reach over his body with your near arm to keep him from flipping out of it. Sit straight up and walk your legs out and away from him to break him down to his stomache. Then, straighten your legs and swivel them away from his head they should look like this 77 if you were on his left side. Once you feet are away and your knees are pointing towards his head sit up and into him to finish the arm lock. Using your hips, try to touch his trapped wrist to the back of his head. Also while Sitting up over him, make sure the arm that was over his bakc weaves in and grabs his far wrist like the wrestlers Chicken wing. (Very hard to explain in print)

Quote:
Also some advice on no gi chokes would be greatly appreciated.

No gi chokes are obviously limited due to lack of handles, but there are quite a few still.

From the front:
Guillotine
Arm triangle
Punch(Fist) Choke
Triangle choke
Brabo (Arm triangle varation)
Anaconda (Another Arm Triangle varation)

From the sides:
Punch Choke
Triangle
Arm triangle
Brabo
Vice choke

From the Back:
Rear Naked (all varations)
Triangle

These are the only ones I use.

Good Luck.>

Post: zefff:

Hey Bushi,

I love arm triangles now and the the Anaconda too. I get a lot of people with it all the time but I sparred with a purple once who I outweighed by 25kgs and he VERY easily defended against it. I asked him how he did it but he only had time for a brief explanation. He said he just raised his arm – if you know this defence against Anaconda can you explain it more so I dont fall fowl to one of my fav subs from that north/south position?

cheers>

Post: The BadBoy:

Zeff did he telephone his arm like he was answering the phone?

I love the Brabo choke. Bushi, do you have any high percentage set ups for the Brabo. I usually get it from side control as a counter to an escape when the guy on bottom has an underhook on my far side.

Also what is a vice choke?

Cheers bro, your the man.>

Post: zefff:

Badboy – Was a while ago now but yes I think his arm was bent. Wasnt really aware of what he was doing as I was trying to pop his head off at the time…I just remember how he breezed out of it.>

Post: The BadBoy:

If i’m wrong someone correct me but my understanding of arm triangles/Anacondas/Brabos/Triangles/etc is that one of your opponents arms is pulled across his throat to the opposite side fo his body to cut his air of from that side. If his arm is bent (like he is answering the telephone) then his air is not closed from that side.>

Post: opariser1001:

the arm across is supposed to cut off the blood, not air. i’m pretty sure most chokes are blood chokes actually.>

Post: Triple T:

Bushi: In the list above of chokes, you listed “Rear Naked (all variations).”

Just for the sake of clarity, would these variations include Judo chokes like the kata hajime?>

Post: Bushi:

Quoting: zefff;48214 Hey Bushi,

I love arm triangles now and the the Anaconda too. I get a lot of people with it all the time but I sparred with a purple once who I outweighed by 25kgs and he VERY easily defended against it. I asked him how he did it but he only had time for a brief explanation. He said he just raised his arm – if you know this defence against Anaconda can you explain it more so I dont fall fowl to one of my fav subs from that north/south position?

cheers

If some one is trying to get the Anaconda, they need your arm (Deltoid) to cut off that Carotid Artery. If you raise your arm hard, it creates a gap between the shoulder and the artery, not to mention takes the leverage off of the inverted Arm Triangle which the Anaconda is. The key is to reach across and grab his tricep and pull it in front of his face then lock the triangle. If you try to go straight to locking the triangle without breaking the arm over, it should and will fail.

Hope that helps.>

Post: Bushi:

Quoting: The BadBoy;48228 Zeff did he telephone his arm like he was answering the phone?

I love the Brabo choke. Bushi, do you have any high percentage set ups for the Brabo. I usually get it from side control as a counter to an escape when the guy on bottom has an underhook on my far side.

Also what is a vice choke?

Cheers bro, your the man. Telephoning counters work for the “Arm triangle” I put my palm on the side of my head and push it away. This provides space between the neck and deltoid muscle thus buying time.

Here is a good instructional series on the Brabo.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WODZrnjBP8g&mode=related&search=

there is 5 parts.

Enjoy.>

Post: Bushi:

Quoting: Triple T;48239 Bushi: In the list above of chokes, you listed “Rear Naked (all variations).”

Just for the sake of clarity, would these variations include Judo chokes like the kata hajime?

No, any choke to be clasified as Rear Naked, must be applied from the rear and not use any clothing thus the naked part.

Kataha relies on the lapel and is also known as the Single wing Choke.

Rear naked has a couple different varations. There is the one most know with the hand in bicep and hand behind his head. Then there is Hand on Delatoid and other behind head (tighter, used for skinny necks) The clasped hand version popular in Judo and the one arm RNC where you grab behind your own neck.

I hope that helps.>

Post: Bushi:

The first choke he shows in this video is what i referred to as the Vice Choke.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDewhiSRilI

He has a whole series on YouTube of No-gi Chokes.

I know, I know, I’m the man. lol

Enjoy the vids guys.>

Post: Bushi:

By the way, I am glad to see that this thread is active again.

*Give thumbs up*>

Post: Triple T:

Quoting: Bushi;48249 Kataha relies on the lapel and is also known as the Single wing Choke.

…I do kata hajime in no-gi all the time…>

Post: Bushi:

Quoting: Triple T;48280 …I do kata hajime in no-gi all the time…

Do you have a pic from the net or personal to show what you are referencing?

THX>

Post: Bushi:

Kataha jime

[IMG http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:1z_k7-7wvCxiDM:http://www.judoinfo.com/images/shime/kata_ha_jime.gif[/IMG >

Post: The BadBoy:

TTT, you sure you don’t mean hadaka jime? This is basically an RNC.

http://judoinfo.com/hadaka.jpg>

Post: Triple T:

Quoting: Bushi;48287 Kataha jime

[IMG http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:1z_k7-7wvCxiDM:http://www.judoinfo.com/images/shime/kata_ha_jime.gif[/IMG 

Using that pic as a foundation, imagine that the hand gripping the lapel instead grips the forearm of the arm trapping the shoulder and the shoulder-trapping arm grips the back of the opponent’s neck instead of the opposite elbow.>

Post: samurai6string:

wait, I think I might know where you are comming from on this one, we were shown a variation of this as if someone tries to reach back when you have an RNC, and you slip your left arm under their shoulder with your hand placed behind their head, effectively making the choke tighter as they atempt to lower thier arm to break the hold. Anyone know what I mean? Or did I lose everyone w/ the bad explaination?>

Post: Bushi:

Quoting: Triple T;48322 Using that pic as a foundation, imagine that the hand gripping the lapel instead grips the forearm of the arm trapping the shoulder and the shoulder-trapping arm grips the back of the opponent’s neck instead of the opposite elbow.

That will work on a novice grappler, but not on an experienced grappler. I mean no disrespect, but you will never see a mid to high level guy use or get caught with it. IMHO.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter what I say. Proof is on the mat.>

Post: Triple T:

Quoting: Bushi;48352 That will work on a novice grappler, but not on an experienced grappler. I mean no disrespect, but you will never see a mid to high level guy use or get caught with it. IMHO.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter what I say. Proof is on the mat.

Not in sub-grap or pure bjj. Add striking and the arm is the easiest thing to attack from backmount due to the tendency to cover the head. Which brings me to my question:

how many neck crank options do I have from backmount? I can brute strength a full nelson to approximate a crucifixion neck crank some of the time and if I miss a choke I can adapt to a facelock, but this isn’t really within the BJJ corpus, AFAIK, and neither of them are very high percentage.>

Post: Bushi:

Neck Cranks can be used to a degree from the back. I think you mentioned most of the ones I would consider using. The face-lock or Rear Naked Jaw lock (When they tuck their chin) are probably the only two I’d use. I can see how a full nelson could work though.>

Post: The BadBoy:

Ok, I’ll try to explain this as best. I end up in half guard an awful lot. I get to my side, half guard his right leg, get the underhook on his right arm with my left, control his other arm with my elbow down and hand cupped on his bicep so he cannot cross face me.

Unless i escape to the side of my underhooking arm and take his back relatively quickly, this guy manages to shift his weight in a clockwise direction so that he basically has me side mounted but still in my half guard. From here he has no problem flatenning me out on my back and esacping to full side mount. Is there anyway i can stop him doing this?

Hope my description is ok. It would be so much easier to show you.>

Post: Bushi:

From the position you describe, I shoot my left arm high into his armpit and whip my (triangled) legs up hard (think side crunch) causing him to brace out with his left hand. I then kip very hard down and underhook his right thigh (think high single leg) I race to get onto my right elbow then post onto my right hand driving into him and sweeping him to his back left 45 degree angle.

(Very similar to Eddie Bravo’s Old school)

Try it. I kill everyone with this sweep.>

Post: The BadBoy:

Could you explain the bit about whipping up ur triangled legs a bit more. I don’t quite get it. Cheers mate.>

Post: Bushi:

Quoting: The BadBoy;48805 Could you explain the bit about whipping up ur triangled legs a bit more. I don’t quite get it. Cheers mate.

You do an explosive leg lift with your legs and press him over your head with your hands on his floating ribs. “Whipping” him up onto his hands to brace creating space for you to hip out underneath and hit the sweep.>

Post: The BadBoy:

Cheers bro will try it tonight.

Ok, one more question. Not about technique as such but more about strategy. how does one go about creating your gameplan or startegy for their jui jitsu?>

Post: Bushi:

Just like the Chester cat asks, Where do you want to go?

I first determine where I want to be. Ie the top. Since I want to be on the top, I will work on takedowns, guard sweeps, positional controls and subs from the top, because you want to always be finishing.

Determine where you want to be and develop techniques to get you in that position and techniques to keep you there and finish the fight.

Make sense?>

Post: The BadBoy:

lol, that’s what I’ve been doing but everything I do is geared towards standing back up. I gotta start trying to finish :)>

Post: zefff:

Bushi,

I am thinking about possibly entering a national competition thats in 2 weeks. The problem is I havent been training at all since the first week in Febuary. What should I focus on if I only have 2 weeks to prepare?>

Post: The BadBoy:

Ummm, I’m no Bushi, but your gameplan bro. Try to get better at doing what your already good at doing .>

Post: zefff:

Okay Ive got 10 days now and I feel like shit. My gameplan is usually to out work them till they gas and weaken…not very sophisticated but hey! Sadly my cardio is not anywhere near regular levels at the mo so I need to be clever, especially as I will be the smallest dude in the 90+ kilos bracket.

I am focusing on scissor sweep and escape from north/south and side control plus escapes from armbar and triangle as I think this might serve me better than trying to better my own offensive technique in 10 days. Does this sound like a good idea? My plan is to be offensive with position rather than subs…if that makes sense.

So should I use my 10 days to develop position, subs or escapes?

thanks>

Post: Triple T:

I’m not Bushi or BadBoy, but what the hell. :-)

I think you should focus on positioning. That sort of implies escapes in my mind, but I guess that depends on how comfortable you are in letting them have certain positions on you. The basis for BJJ from the days of Helio was always victory through superior positioning, as far as I recall, and especially if you’re the small guy in the division I think you should focus on being in the best place than on trying to “force” subs.>

Post: The BadBoy:

Escapes, Escapes and more escapes brother mine. When I say escapes I mean getting out of side control, mount etc. positional escapes.>

Post: zefff:

Okay I got this competiton tommorow and I am strangely not hyped at all. Maybe it is because I havent done any prep so I dont have the usual urge to make someone pay for the pain and suffering Ive gone through…anyway,

I should just about make 88.3kgs with gi but Im a bit worried so should I not eat a meal tonight, not drink and wait till after my weigh in tommorrow. Or should I eat and drink tonight, shit in the morning and dont drink fluids till after weigh in?

Diet for the next 24 hours:

Roasted chicken breast
Vegetables
Fruit
Noodles
Bread
Water
Porridge

Going training tonight, nothing too physical beyond a very mild warmup and good stretch. Hoping to only focus on collar choke techniques as Ive done all I can on escapes and want to avoid even shrimping :lol:

Let me know what you think, thanks!>

Post: The BadBoy:

What are you weighing now?

Edit: I think I’m too late. How’d you get on bro?>

Post: zefff:

I was 89kgs yesterday but hit 85kgs on the scales today to fit nicely inside 88.3kg limit…I won! Only had 2 points scored against me over 3 fights. They could not deal with my single leg shoots! 8-) My first fight I won by armbar from mount after securing a huge lead. The second was kimura. The third was a points win after a crazy brawl with an Italian from 302 CGJJ. I also had the honour of being reffed by Roger Gracie and Braulio Estima who also presented my medal.

We had 2 other wins and 1 (should of been gold) silver for white belts in other weight categories too as well as Xandhino getting a seemingly effortless win in his superfight. Cant wait for the vids!

edit: Here is the proof!
[URL=”http://img261.imageshack.us/my.php?image=laefbf6d962bfc40cd18d6ajx4.jpg” [IMG http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/7015/laefbf6d962bfc40cd18d6ajx4.th.jpg[/IMG [/URL 

Sorry for hijacking this great thread. Soon I will have more questions once I see the vid.

peace>

Post: Bushi:

Congrats Zefff. And for those on the forum, I answered his questions over Myspace. I have been really busy lately, but now I’m Back.

Sorry.>

Post: The BadBoy:

Congrats Zeff, good one. Could you post Bushi’s advice here for future reference.>

Post: zefff:

Nothing to long, I explained my situation and what I had been working on as it was hort notice and my first competition:

“I would continue with the escapes and add fighting for the top position into your mental gameplan. If you are going to be the smaller guy then you need to be ON TOP. Even my strategy for guard would be sweep or fight to get up. There is nothing more draining than being under a bigger stronger guy. I would start all my sparring session under some one and work that gamplan. “

Fighting for top is exactly what I did. My strategy for points was simple. Get ontop, stay ontop!

1) take down as quick as possible
2) get side control
3) knee on belly
4) mount
5) control and only sub if there was no risk

It is weird though, I heard from a lot of freinds what competion does for your rolling but it is true. Instantly I feel as if my brain is now seeing things that it was sluggish to see before. Would it be the same if I lost?

thanks!>

Post: Bushi:

Lets get a new topic. Anyone?>

Post: bamboo:

I have a question asking your preference and why as well as what you think the drawbacks would be of what I’ll ask. (wow, that was oddly phrased).

So when on back and have your hooks in: Do you prefer to have 1 arm around the neck with the second either:
a- under the shoulder and holding the wrist of the arm
or
b- under the shoulder gripping the body or gi
or
c- none of the above- So what do you do?

Cheers,

bamboo>

Post: Bushi:

I prefer the Marcello Harness. 1 arm over the neck one under the armpit gripping and hugging the torso. I can set up chokes armlocks and maintain the position all at the same time.>

Post: zefff:

Brabo choke (with gi) : I am really struggling to pass through my top overhooking arm. I cant get it at all. How do I make it easier for myself to get the hand through?>

Post: Stg:

what are some good techniques to try on people who stack you agressively but dont leave thier hips hanging over you, so you cant try the feet on hip sweep? what’s a defensive escape/counter to do to get out of when someone pins your own arm under you so you’re only using one arm?>

Post: zefff:

Quoting: zefff;50366 Brabo choke (with gi) : I am really struggling to pass through my top overhooking arm. I cant get it at all. How do I make it easier for myself to get the hand through?

It seems to be cool for now. Rather than fighting to snake through my arm, I give them the underhook and that creates my chance…I need to watch I dont give my back though. Hope this makes sense.>

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