TKD Q&A

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TKD Q&A
Original Poster: BLACK PANTA
Forum: Korean Martial Arts
Posted On: 02-01-2007, 05:19

Orginal Post: BLACK PANTA: Now I do not take TKD but I opened this thread so that the TKD practitioners in here can have a chance to answer any questions and resolve any mis-conceptions about their art.

Post: jerbo8:

hehe….good one panta. ok i have a question. does TKD involve any iron body traning? like banging your arms against wooden poles to toughen them up or hitting a makiwara board to harden your hands and feet? how good is TKD handwork? what is it like? what do you think TKDs strong points are?>

Post: Umy:

do you use jump kicks in sparring? :lol:>

Post: TKDman:

It’s kinda hard to speak for an entire art, especially one that is as widespread as TKD. I can only describe what my dojang does or don’t do.
As far as the iron body stuff goes jerbo, my dojang doesn’t partake in that. Does it mean that I myself couldn’t? Nope. Banging our arms against wooden poles…are you talking about the WC wooden dummy? My dojang doesn’t have one of those. I’ll be honest, TKD’s handwork could use a lot of improvement. That question is a little too objective to answer in all cases. What is it like? Uhhh…I don’t think I could describe it over the internet. Contrary to popular belief, there are many hand techniques, offensive and defensive, in TKD. The reason it is dwarfed by kicks, in the publics mind, is because of all the demos you’ve probably all seen. The ones with people breaking boards doing backflips, jumping and executing a 360 degree roundhouse and breaking a board, that kinda stuff. So knowbody cares if you can punch through a board, they “Oohh and ahh” over breaking 3 boards in mid-air. So handwork exists but it isn’t stressed like the legwork. Which is why I’m looking forward to Wing Chun at college. Can’t wait! TKD’s strong points? Long range and speed

In answer to Umy’s question, I have used a jump kick or two in sparring but I don’t recommend it. Neither do the instructors. Like Bruce Lee said, “Boards don’t hit back” in addition they also don’t side step or close the gap. A “safe” jump kick might be throw a front kick and follow it up with a jump front kick. If they’re slow or a novice, you’ll drive them in a straight line. If they have an understanding of sparring, then they’ll sidestep and roundhouse you in the head.
For the record I have been in TKD for about 3 and a half years and am a blue belt (3 below black) :D>

Post: nEo-Wolf:

I do tae kwon do, im a black tag and through my experiance alot of the stuff is useless unless you know how to use it properly. Alot of people do not undertand what the block is used for for example. All the flashy kicks look nice but how many times could you effectively connect with it? They take to much time which can be dangerous if your in a street fight or sparring… Alot of the basic kicks are the best and most useful like the push, roundhouse, snap kicks… For most TKD people they concentrate on the legs and dont use their hands so much. Personally I prefer my hand and use my legs to let me get a good combo of hands in. When Im done with TKD I would like to try Muay Thai out as the art has impressed me so much and would like to get into it. But TKD is a great art, depends on the practitioner though…>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

How much time is spent in training distance knowledge? I know this may vary from dojang to dojang. And when in your training do you learn distance knowledge?>

Post: nEo-Wolf:

Yeah we kind of learn effective techniques at a distance and how to close in to a closer range. It’s not to much distance, it’s mixed really. Like you say it varies…>

Post: Umy:

Is your typical TKD competition similar to point sparring?

What is it like sparring without body protectors on (if you use them) ? Does it feel a lot different?>

Post: binhdinhboy:

y is it some competitions discourage the use of hands? ive always wondered about this…>

Post: binhdinhboy:

y is it some competitions discourage the use of hands? ive always wondered about this…i remembered reading that its because the skilled working class wanted to protect their hands. is this true?>

Post: SolidRedux:

At my dojang we do absolutly no hand work. All kicking. This is why I show up usually half an hour early and jab weight masters. The most effective kicks I find are round-house, push and front kick. I currently wish to cross-train in kickboxing or ju-jitsu because I feel WTF TKD is more of a sport then a martial art. But if you wish to have powerful, fast kicks then TKD is right for you but boxing training on the side is a must.>

Post: nEo-Wolf:

[quote=0o~KiNg*UmY~o0 Is your typical TKD competition similar to point sparring?

What is it like sparring without body protectors on (if you use them) ? Does it feel a lot different?[/quote 

Yeah competitions are pretty much point sparring it being either point stop or continuos in my experiance.
Sparring without body protectors aint to much different, there usually so in competitions you can see if they hit the big circle target easier. You may have to keep the sparring on a lighter level without them, but we never use body protectors…
I dont like when hands, knees and elbows are not used as they are very effective weapons and much quicker in cases than kicking. Kickboxing is good to cross train in as it gets your hands up to speed. Im more of natural puncher and a good kicker so I tend to use my hands.>

Post: TKDman:

[quote=binhdinhboy y is it some competitions discourage the use of hands? ive always wondered about this…i remembered reading that its because the skilled working class wanted to protect their hands. is this true?[/quote 
I’ve never heard of this explanation. But it doesn’t make much sense if TKD was developed as an art for the military. We DO have punches, blocks, knifehands etc. It’s just that the flashy kicks stick out in people’s minds because they’re different. Like I said, flashy kicks are for breaking demonstrations. They don’t make sense as far as self-defense because of the exertion and balance that you must sacrifice. A smart opponent isn’t going to sit there while you try and tornado kick him.>

Post: Kyorgi:

Anyways:

For point sparring I spar for points at tournaments, its usually 2 1 minute rounds with a 30 second rest, all hand techniques to the body are 1 point and all foot techniques to the body and head are 1 point. The thing that I hate about point sparring is when once a point is scored they stop, how can you even break a sweat doig that. Sometimes I spar at home with out padding but I end up killing my shins on my best firends knee

Quote:
do you use jump kicks in sparring?

I use jump spining back kick alot, and if I am WAY better than me opponent I might try a 360 roundhouse…that is if its not for tournament puposes (I don’t wanna risk anything).>

Post: Kyorgi:

As far as basic kicks go:

Most of the kicks in sparring are roundhouses
90% roundhouse
As far as push, round, and straight kick being the most effective kicks (i think it was solid redux who said it) you forgot 2 of most basic and effective kicks in existance…side kick and back kick, if you say that back kick doesn’t work in sparring you must have brain damage…since most guys roundhouse 90% of the time that means you can get an easy point by backing kicking everytime they roundhouse, and for those damn flamingo sparrers (on one leg the whole time roundhousing) back kick the mofos and make them fall over.>

Post: gohara:

Sounds about right

2 of most basic and effective kicks in existance…side kick and back kick, if you say that back kick doesn’t work in sparring you must have brain damage…

keep it basic>

Post: Kyorgi:

old thread…i know, but I want to keep it alive

in addition to what gohara just said, back kick is what won the 2000 olympics for Steven Lopez>

Post: TKDartist:

A little lesson about TKD hand techniques.

Tae kwon do hand work is actually very good. Everyong rips on it because they don’t understand and if your dojang doesn’t teach it then don’t try to explain it.
TKD was originated from Korean battlefield arts and most of the hand techniques
are lethal. We use our legs for power strikes and our hands for accurate strikes.
Most hand strikes are delivered to soft targets like the eyes,throat,temples and side of the neck. We also have adopted the use of boxing techniques probably in the 60’s when kickboxing became popular and all our strikes were illegal. It’s also nice when you don’t want to kill someone. I have to go to work now. I’ll come back later, please give feedback.
P.S. I am a first Dan black belt in a traditional TKD system, far as I can tell the only black belt answering on this thread.>

Post: gohara:

Now that sounds interesting. where I train they do not teach the hand aspect of tkd so had to go elsewhere to learn this.

george>

Post: Kyorgi:

I am a first Dan black belt in a traditional TKD system

What do you mean? Traditional? it was created too recently to have a traditional style.>

Post: JRW:

ITF=traditional and WTF=sport/new ??>

Post: Hengest:

Quote:
TKD was originated from Korean battlefield arts

Oh man, not this one again…. :roll:>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

Oh yes. Flying kicks to knock armoured spear-wielding warriors off horses – the most logical explanation in the world.>

Post: TKDartist:

Alright, first, Ilyo, it is a inaccurate statement to say that Tae kwon do is too new
to have a traditional system. The name Tae kwon do was derived in the fifties but
it is the evolution of the styles that have been used in Korea over a couple of thousand years. Many Karate styles are credited with being thousands of years old but I’ll bet you they didn’t originally have the names we use now. And when I said
traditional I meant that our style under our Grandmaster focuses on combat and the lifestyle of the martial arts rather than sport. WTF affiliated BTW.
Hengest, I am not sure how to respond since you didn’t really say much. You’ve obviously heard alot of arguments about TKD history, but come on man , knock the
chip off your shoulder. Like I said already it wasn’t called Tae kwon do at the time but the battlefield was the origin of arts like Tae kyon and soo bak do. These ancient style are the lineage of Tae kwon do. Half the genetics in my blood carry the name Foreman but since it’s from my mothers side I don’t have that name myself. A name change over time doesn’t mean the bloodline starts over.
And Wilhelm, I don’t remember saying anything about that,do I. If someone else did then go argue with them, but don’t try to dump it off on me. If you don’t no my style and don’t understand my style, then please don’t knock it.Don’t assume that
everyone who practices Tae kwon do is the same or that it can’t be effective.
And if you really just don’t want to hear people explaining TKD then what the heck are you doing on this thread.Open your minds, gentlemen, it’s not about the style it’s about the practitioner.

Peace,
Josh>

Post: Hengest:

Quote:
You’ve obviously heard alot of arguments about TKD history, but come on man , knock the chip off your shoulder.

Josh mate, if growing weary of this revisionist version of TKD “history”, which has no basis in fact, having just heard it for the millionth time is having a chip on my shoulder, then it’s a fair cop guv.

I don’t want to go into detail, cos it seems we have to do it about once every couple of months here, but, to put it bluntly, TKD has nothing to do with ancient Korean fighting methods, hwarang, samurang or any other junk that the Korean nationalists like to spout. It’s foundations lie in Japanese karate. If there was any Korean roots to it (which I personally doubt) then they come from taekkyon, which was not a secret fighting art of the hwarang or any of that bollocks. It’s traceable as far back as the 17th century and, much like capoeira, was a foot-fighting and pushing game played in Korean back streets by muggers, hoods and general street toughs.

Soo bahk do is a term used by Hwang Kee as an alternative to the name tang soo do. Soo bahk is what a lot of “historians” claim is the root of TKD but this is a damn clever arguement since no one knows what soo bahk actually was. The little evidence available suggests nothing more than a slapping game rather than a complex fighting system.

And anyway, arts that actually stem from battlefield tactics, from Japanese kumiuchi to German ringen, are almost always grappling styles. Why? Cos it makes no sense to punch someone who’s wearing armour. It’s much more sensible to try and choke them out or wrestle with them so that you can put your dagger to good use.>

Post: Bushi:

http://www.fightauthority.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=960

Great thread started by Hengest about Korean propaganda surrounding the Hwarang>

Post: taekwondoin:

i have a question about poomse:
my trainer says they should look like a real fight
but so the 270° turns are not logical for me especially because my trainer told me that you don’t look at first in the direction where the enemy is but when you turn

if anybody has a good explanation thx>

Post: shurite44:

Quote:
does TKD involve any iron body training? like banging your arms against wooden poles to toughen them up or hitting a makiwara board to harden your hands and feet? how good is TKD handwork? what is it like? what do you think TKDs strong points are?

Not too many dojangs practice this (iron body training) anymore.

Makiwara training is normally done more for focus and accuracy rather than hand conditioning. Some older style TKD schools still do quite a bit of breaking so they would incorporate makiwara into the training. Most TKD schools do not practice makiwara and many no longer do breaking.

TKD hand work for the Olympic style TKD is primarily defensive. Used to cover the body and head against kicks. Although they do use punches, ridgehands, and shuto type techniques they are not the emphasis of the art.

TKD strong points are kicking and foot work. Also TKD is an Olympic sport which has increased the sports popularity. Many TKD practitioners are also considered good at breaking techniques, (boards & bricks)

Quote:
do you use jump kicks in sparring?

Yes jump kicks are used in TKD sparring. TKD makes a distinction between jump and flying kicks. Both are practiced and used during sparring.

Quote:
How much time is spent in training distance knowledge? I know this may vary from dojang to dojang. And when in your training do you learn distance knowledge?

I can not give you an amount of time spent on distance training. It is in general incorporated in nearly every aspect of the training though from the very beginning of training. Keep in mind an Olympic style sport TKD dojang and a more karate style TKD school would approach this subjects differently.

Quote:
Is your typical TKD competition similar to point sparring?
What is it like sparring without body protectors on (if you use them) ? Does it feel a lot different?

In general there are two different types of TKD tournaments. Tournaments geared toward Olympic style sparring and traditional open style TKD tournaments that would have form and point fighting.
Body protectors are worn for Olympic style sparring, for point style sparring they are sometimes worn but not always. Personally I do not like wearing chest gear. As far as the feel it is not much different with it on or off.

Quote:
y is it some competitions discourage the use of hands? ive always wondered about this…i remembered reading that its because the skilled working class wanted to protect their hands. is this true?

Like any competitive sport the rules of the game tend to shape the way it is played. This is true in TKD. Most people feel in general the refs score better for kicks than hands, also in Olympic style sparring you can not hit to the head with your hands. This does encourage kicks and these rules were put in place to do just that. In point style TKD many times the rules will give you two points for a head kick. This also encourages kicking. Many of these rules were put in place to distinguish TKD competition from karate competition.

I have heard the story about craftsmen protecting their hands also. I assume it is a myth. Especially if you look at many TKD practitioners from the 60s and 70s they were heavy into breaking techniques.

:D>

Post: shurite44:

[quote=taekwondoin i have a question about poomse:
my trainer says they should look like a real fight
but so the 270° turns are not logical for me especially because my trainer told me that you don’t look at first in the direction where the enemy is but when you turn

if anybody has a good explanation thx[/quote 

taekwondoin, poomse (form or kata) in TKD are descended from Japanese and Okinawan Kata. The original forms of TKD were called pyong an and naihanji or chul gi. There are other more advance forms also. These forms are generally from the shurite line of Okinawan karate. Usually taught to the Koreans by Japanese Karateka, the names of these forms are pronounced differently in Japanese and Okinawan dialect but the characters for them are the same. Many of these forms were actually authored by an Okinawan master named Itosu. Few TKD schools still use these forms but many Tang Soo Do schools do. The newer TKD forms are simply derivatives of the old karate forms.

A kata is not going to look like a fight. There are several theories and reasons for this. One way to look at your forms is as a formal practice of technique designed to build a strong mind and body. There is an ideal of perfection in forms that you should strive to attain. By doing this in kata practice it will teach you a method or way (Do) to strive for perfection in your daily life. There are other ways to interpret forms with a focus towards self protection also.

In the Japanese version of the original forms most karateka do look in the final direction of the turn prior to making the turn. Some TKD practitioners do this and some don’t. Sorry I can not give you a better explanation of that but it is basically just how their instructors taught them.

I would not recommend thinking about your forms as a big fight. I do not think the authors intended this. In my opinion a better way to look at forms is similar to the English alphabet. Each movement may represent a letter. Think of a self protection move as a word. If you take the first four movements of the alphabet it spells nothing (abcd). But take the fourth letter (D) 19th letter (O) and the 7th letter (G) this spells a word, DOG. The same with kata or forms. The first three or four movements together may mean nothing. But take for example movement 1, 4, 12 and 15 and they form a self protection move. But also keep in mind many movements are linked together throughout forms. These movements probably do go together in an actual sequence.>

Post: Kyorgi:

Why don’t you just fucking reveal who you are, no one on hear used the hwarang kicking people of horses thing, so why even bother posting about it.
Someone just ban this fucking retard.>

Post: Kyorgi:

Its K-Y-O-R-G-I. And wow. You made a variation on my name. Its hilairous. No really. Its hilarious.

To make a word plural that ends with an “s” you put the apostraphe after it. Dumbshit.

How the fuck are you still posting.>

Post: Kyorgi:

:roll: okay, send me one.>

Post: shurite44:

[quote=Kyorgi Someone just ban this fucking retard.[/quote 

I agree, I don’t think this type of post would last long in the Japanese forum. These posts should be deleted, they in no way address the topic. This person is a troll and the posts are an attempt to hijack the thread.>

Post: setsu nin to:

shurite44

“don’t think this type of post would last long in the Japanese forum”

Thank you very much, now you gave him idea to come to Japanese forum… :lol:

Unfortunatly I dont belive that I am powerfull mod as I was in old forum, so I cant put pictures of half naked males in his avatar… :cry:
But I can… :mrgreen:>

Post: shurite44:

[quote=setsu nin to Thank you very much, now you gave him idea to come to Japanese forum… :lol:
[/quote 

Sorry, :lol:>

Post: Kyorgi:

hehe good thing my name is Kyorgi…I guess buiken has his eye on a royal dog.>

Post: setsu nin to:

buicken

“i find your post somewhat arousing.”

No, no, that me, I am helping people all the time, you maybe didnt noticed it before…

“just how will you help me realise my inner fagotry”

You see, thats progress, you start talking about it…

Youst go to dr. Phil web page and he will explain you everything, dont warry everything will be ok…>

Post: shurite44:

This is a sticky for goodness sakes. :x

Moderators and members, lets get this thing cleaned up so it can accomplish it’s function. :|

Do we want guests and other members thinking this is how Korean martial artists talk to each other. :oops:>

Post: Hengest:

buicken, you’re being a dick. Pack it in. The odd funny remark is OK, but hijacking a thread is not on. So either contribute something worthwhile, shut up, or piss off.>

Post: setsu nin to:

I deleted all buicken posts in these thread…>

Post: Kyorgi:

all hail setsu!>

Post: shurite44:

[quote=setsu nin to I deleted all buicken posts in these thread…[/quote 

Good job setsu nin to.

I have not been on this forum for long, but I can tell you guys use your moderator powers with diligent discretion. You want people to have their say, it is after all a forum.

But there are times when comments just do not belong in a serious thread. I appreciate the action.
Thank you
Shurite44 :)>

Post: shurite44:

Ok, Kyorgi. Now that we have our little troll problem solved lets get our beloved sticky back on topic.

I have a question. What is the difference between Tang Soo Do and Tae Kwon Do?

Which one came first? Are they related?

And a question on the practical side. What is the best way to get more speed in my kicks?

Thanks ahead of time.

Shurte44
bow>

Post: shurite44:

No one has any more korean martial art questions?

Is Kyorgi still posting much, I have not seen him for a while?>

Post: scribbz:

[quote=TKDman [quote=binhdinhboy y is it some competitions discourage the use of hands? ive always wondered about this…i remembered reading that its because the skilled working class wanted to protect their hands. is this true?[/quote 
I’ve never heard of this explanation. But it doesn’t make much sense if TKD was developed as an art for the military. We DO have punches, blocks, knifehands etc. It’s just that the flashy kicks stick out in people’s minds because they’re different. Like I said, flashy kicks are for breaking demonstrations. They don’t make sense as far as self-defense because of the exertion and balance that you must sacrifice. A smart opponent isn’t going to sit there while you try and tornado kick him.[/quote 

well from what I PERSONALLY have heard, tae kwon do kicks are said to as fast as someones punches. so if your legs have longer reach then the hand, can generate the same speed or faster speed then the hand, and possibly have more power, why use hands? not to say tae kwon do doesnt. but its not as emphasized as kicks.>

Post: graham1:

Would that life’s violent confrontations could be sorted at kicking range. Most of us on this forum would win every time. Unfortunately life doesn’t run like competitions, your opponents determine what range you’ve got to work with. The surprise element, allied with adrenal dump, comes into play & then, I can assure you from experience, the last thing you’ll be thinking about is kicking in your initial responses.>

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