Chinese Martial Arts/Styles

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Chinese Martial Arts/Styles
Original Poster: BLACK PANTA
Forum: Kung Fu Styles, Chinese Martial Arts
Posted On: 03-04-2007, 15:33

Orginal Post: BLACK PANTA: Here’s the thread y’all. The first of what I hope to be many. This thread is to share, discuss, ask questions about all the Chinese Martial Arts/Styles. First I would like to start off by listing all the Chinese MA/styles we can name. Now if any questions arise, please feel free to ask and I am sure that one of us (if not all of us) will be more than willing to answer.

Now me, being a Kung Fu practitioner I know some of the Kung Fu Styles.

Now lets see what my brain can mustre.

Kung Fu: Shaolin; Wing Chun, Ba Gua, Tai Chi, Black Dragon, White Tiger, Mantis, Eagle, Choy lee fut, White Crane, Lohan, Monkey, Drunken.

This all I can mustre up at this time, I am bombarded by distraction right now, the sweet sweet television. please add on you all. And dont forget to ask questions or descriptions.

Post: 8LimbsScientist:

San Shou
Dog Fist
TongBei White Ape
XingYi
Hung Gar
Eagle Claw
Baiji
Pak Mei>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

there is also Cha Chuan (cha quan) and Wushu. Where did you hear about Dog Fist Monkey? Can you elaborate?>

Post: 8LimbsScientist:

Dog Fist is a style of Kung Fu that emphasizes ground fighting. Not Gracie-type groundfighting of course.

http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/irondogfst/dogfist/whatis.htm>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

Thanks Monkey, you wouldn’t be able to find a link with some techniques would you?>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

oh monkey I found a site on google about dog fist, this is part of the Shaolin 5 animal system. I am learning this type of ground fighting in my training. Thank for the info BTW. It is very unlike BJJ and Gracie JJ ground fightning.>

Post: TigerPaw:

is Cha Chuang, Chang Chuan? Traditionall Martial Kung Fu, although not very much breathing excercises.. Although at my school we breath before every excercise and start the class by standing in horse-stance duing three of Hung Gar’s ‘Twelve Bridges’. So I’m not much for jogging around that much. Although there’s still good practice in that. Dont get me wrong.

High stances, long movements and so on, Argh. Wish I could remember the link to the site.. Or which temple they were said to have come from..

Well, You could add Choy Gar and Lau Gar, Although we’ve got the main three Lau sets in Hung Gar, But there are independent Lau styles in England and Scotland if I’m not misstaken..>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

http://cclib.nsu.ru/projects/satbi/satbi-e/martart/wushu/index.html

Thanks to Bamboo for this most excellent link. I urge you all to visit it. It really is a cool link.>

Post: Fa Jing:

we going to list subdivisions like Chin Na

Northern/Southern Sil Lum
Wing Tsun
Kenpo? (im not sure)
Wu Shu
Chi Kung
Ba Gua
Qigong
San shou>

Post: wuming:

I don’t think kenpo is chinese.>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

Kenpo no, Kempo yes (I believe)>

Post: wuming:

Kempo, I never heard of it…

What exactly is this kempo you speak of?>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

Oh shit you know what I’m messed up, Shorinji Kempo in Japanese. It is said to me the link between Kung Fu and Karate. Shorinji Kempo is the Japanese way of saying Shaolin Kung Fu. My bad. I wasn’t really paying attention. My bad.>

Post: setsu nin to:

As Panta already said there is White Crane (Southern style) but there is also Black Crane (Northen style).>

Post: setsu nin to:

Wow, I finder realy long list of Kung Fu styles. I will post it all here. Here is first and realy short part of it.

Chiao-Ti; Chih Yu-Hsi; Shuai-Chiao
-Pai-Chang
-Pai-Chang
-Shuai-Go

Chih Yu-His

Chuan-Fa; Ken Fat; Kempo; Chinese Kempo
-Chugoku

Jou Fa

Sanshou

Tamo Chien

Ti-Sha Shou

Tso-Ku Shu>

Post: Stg:

these are the ones i know of/have heard of:

wing chun
shuai chiao
the animal styles(tiger,dragon,snake,leapord,crane,mantis,eagle,pheonix,crab,chicken[i’m serious ,insect[again,serious ,unicorn,toad,scorpion,lizard, that’s all i can think of for animals)
shaolin fist
hung ga
drunken fist (8 immortal whatsitcalled)
san shou
the tai chis (sun,wu,chen,yang)
hop gar
xing yi
ba gua
white lotus
chin na
yi jin jing
lui hi ba fa
wushu>

Post: Gong||Jau:

[quote=Katsu Jin Ken 
Chi Kung
Qigong[/quote 

Different spellings of the same thing. Not really a martial art, per se, just an exercise for cultivating chi/qi that many arts use. Lots of schools that teach a non-internal style will incorporate some of this the same way other schools use stretching, simply because of all the beneficial side effects that it produces.

Ditto for Chin Na. I don’t think there’s a style that focuses exclusively on it; it’s more like a grappling system that a lot of styles incorporate into their training later on.>

Post: setsu nin to:

Here is second part of list (much longer than first one).

Kung-Fu; Wu Shu; Gung-Fu; Chinese Boxing

Ax Hand
Ba-Ji
Bai-Ma-Sya-Shan
Bak-Sing
Bak-Sing Choy-Li-Fut
Black Tiger
Bok Fu Pai (“White Tiger”)
Bok Mei Pai; Pat Mei Pai (“White Eyebrow”)
Cannon Fist
Cha Chuan
Chang Chuan Pi-Kua
Chang Chuan; Changquan (“Long Fist”)
Chi Hsing
Chi Hsuan Men
Chi Hsuan Sho
Chi Jiao
Chi-Chi-San
Chia Chia Chuan
Chien Yuen
Chin-Na; Feng-Chiu Shu; Tso-Ku Shu; Ti-Sha Shou
Ching-Nien Chuan
Cho Chiao
Choi Li Fo Chia Chuan
Choy
Choy Mok
Choy-Gar; Choy-Ga; Tsai
Choy-Li-Fut; Choy-Lay-Fut
Hung-Hsing
Chuan Chu Shing Ie
Chung Chuan
Chung Tao Chuan
Crane
Dachenquan
Di-Tang
Dim Mak
Don Bei
Drunken Monkey
Drunken Style
Du
Eagle Claw
Eight Drunken Fairies
Eight Immortals
Eight Trigrams
Eighteen Daoist Palms
Emei
Er-Liang-Men; Erh-Lang-Men
Fan-Tzu; Fan-Tzu-Men; Ba-Fan
Feng-Chiu Shu
Five Animals
Five Elders
Five Families
Fong Ngan
Fu Hu Chuan
Fu-Jow Pai; Fu-Chiao Pai (“Tiger Claw”)
Fukien
Fut
Fut-Gar; Fut-Ga; Fu-Jya (“Buddha Palm”)
Grand Earth
Hakka Chuan
Hao Chuan
Hap Ka
Ho-Chi
Hok; Hork Yang (“Crane”)
Honan Chuan
Hop-Gar; Ho-Jya; Ho-Chia; Lama
Hou Chuan; Ta-Cheng Chuan; Ta Sheng
Hsia Chia Chuan
Hsien Lie He Chuan; Hsin I Liu He Chuan (“Six Harmonies”)
Hsing-I; Hsing-Yi; Hsing-I Lu-Ho Chuan; I-Chuan; Xingyiquan
Five Element Xing-I
Six Harmonies Xing-I
Hua Chien
Hua Chuan
Hua Mountain
Hung Chuan
Hung-Chia Chuan
Hung-Fat
Hung-Ga
Hung-Gar; Hung-Kuen; Hung Chuan; Hung Kune
I-Chuan; Yi-Quan; (originally, Ta-Cheng Chuan)
Jow-Ga
Kang-Fa
Ke-Chia
King-Li
Kuei Ting
Kuen Hue Hok Pai (“Tiger Crane”)
Kuen Hue Hokpai
Kun Lun Pai
Kung Chia
Kung Li
Kung-Ki Chuan
Kuo Chuan
Kwantung
Kwong Sai Look Leum
Lan Shou
Lau-Gar; Lau-Ga
Law Horn
Lay-Gar
Le-Fa
Li-Gar; Li-Chia
Liang-I (“Two Instruments”)
Lien Wan
Liu-Chia Chuan
Liu-Gar; Li-Ga; Liu-Jya
Liu-He
Liu-Ho Chuan (“Buddha Disciple’s Boxing”)
Liu-Ho Pa-Fa
Lo-Han Chuan
Long Fist
Loong Fu Pai
Loong Kuen Chuan
Loong Ying Mor Kiu (“Southern Dragon”; “Dragon Style Magical Arms”)
Lor Horn Mon
Lost Monkey
Lost Track
Luk Hop Kuen
Lung-Hsing (“Dragon”); Lung-Hsing Pa-Kua Chang (“Dragon Style Eight Trigrams Palm”)

thats all for tonight, I have to go now. i will post more of it tomorow.>

Post: TigerPaw:

Hay Say Fu.>

Post: Stg:

how could i have forgotten buddha palm and monkey :(>

Post: setsu nin to:

Here is the last part of list…

Kung-Fu; Wu Shu; Gung-Fu; Chinese Boxing

Ma-Chung Lama-Pei
Mei Hua: see Tang-Lang; Tang-Lang Chuan (“Praying Mantis”)
Mi-Chung; Mi-Chung-I (“Lost Track”)
Mi-Tsung-I; Yen Ching Chuan
Mian Chuan
Mien Chuan
Mo Chuan
Mo-Chia; Mo-Jia-Quan
Mok-Gar; Mok-Ga; Mo-Jya
Monkey: See Tai-Sing Pek-Kwar
My-Jong-Law-Horn
Nam Wah Pai
Nan Chuan
Natural System
Ng Ga Kin (“Five-Formed Fist”)
Northern Dragon
Northern Long Fist
O-Mei Shan
Pa Chuan
Pa Ming Chuan
Pa Shih Chuan
Pa Tuan Chin
Pa-Chi Chuan; Pajiquan
Pa-Fa Chuan
Pa-Kua; Paqua Chang; Baguazhang (“Eight Trigrams”)
Chiang Jung Chiao
Chiu Loong Paqua Chang
Combined
Honan
Hopei
Pa-Kua Leung Yee
Shansi
Tzu Jan Te
Wu-Tang; Wutang Chuan; Wu-Tang-Shan
Pak-Hoc; Pai-Ho Chuan (“White Crane”); Hao Chuan; Ta Sheng (“Crane Boxing”)
Bai-Ho
Chang Er Gau Fukien White Crane
Tibetan Crane
Wu Mei White Crane
Yunnan White Crane
Pak-Pai
Pangai-Noon
Pao (“Leopard”)
Pao Chui
Pat Mei Pai
Pei-Pai Fo-Chia Chuan
Phoenix Eye Fist
Pi-Kua Chuan; Pi-Qua
Plum Flower Fist
Plum Flower Praying Mantis
Po Kwa Zen
Praying Mantis
Pu Don
Que Moi Shantung
Ru He Chuan
Sam Sow Chi
San Soo
San-Hwang Pao-Chui; Hsing-Kung Chuan
Seven Stars Praying Mantis
Shaolin
Shau-Wan Chuan
Sil-Lum; Siu-Lum; Sil-Lum Pai (“Shaolin”)
Long Fist (Northern)
Northern
Fukien Sil-Lum
Honan Five Animals
Shantung
Shantung Black Tiger
Shensi Sil-Lum
Wu Hsing Chuan (“Five Animals”; “Five Animals Pattern Fist”)
(The Five Animals are: Tiger (Fu), Leopard (Bao), Snake (Sare), Crane (Hok), Dragon (Loong))
Southern
Hung-Gar
Lau-Gar
Li-Gar
Mok-Gar
Phoenix Eye Fist
Six Harmonies Praying Mantis
Six Harmonies
Six Methods Praying Mantis
Snake and Hawk
Southern Dragon
Southern Praying Mantis
Stone Monkey
Sum-Yee
Sun Ping Chuan
Syin-Yee Liu Ha Pa Fa Chuan
Ta Sheng Pek Kwar; Ta-Sheng-Men; Tai Shing Pekwar
Monkey Kung Fu
Drunken Monkey
Lost Monkey
Stone Monkey
Tall Monkey
Wood Monkey
Ta Sheng
Ta-Cheng Chuan (“Great Achievement Boxing”)
Ta-Hung Men
Ta-Mo
Tai-Chi Chuan; Taijiquan
Chang
Chen
Cheng
Fu
Guang Ping Yang
Hao
Hsu
Hu Lei Jia (“Thunder”)
Lee (modified)
Li
Lui
Sun
Tsuen
Wu Jianquan
Wu Yuxiang
Yang
Tai-I Chuan
Tai-Tsu Chuan; Tai-Tsu-Chang Chuan (“Emperor’s Long Fist”)
Tall Monkey
Tam Tui; Tan-Tui Men Chuan
Tang Shou Tao
Tang-Lang; Tang-Lang Chuan (“Praying Mantis”)
Ba Pu Tang Lang
BaBo Tang Lang
Bare Mantis
Chi-Hsing Tang-Lang (“Seven Stars Praying Mantis”); Tang-Lang Gou-Dz (Praying Mantis Hook)
Chu Gar Praying Mantis
Chow Gar; Zhou Gar
Chuka Shaolin
Jook Lum
Kawan-Pai Tang-Lang; Liu-Hor Tang-Lang
Kwong Sai Jook Lum; Tsu-Chia Tang-Lang
Liu-He Tang-Lang
Mei-Hwa Tang-Lang; Mei-Hua Tang Lang
Qi Xing
Shwei-Shou Tang-Lang
Tai Mantis; Tai-Chi Mantis
Wah Lum Tam Tui Praying Mantis
Tao Yin
Tao-Chia Chuan
Tao-Ga
Tao-Te-Ching
Ti Kung Chuan
Ti-Sha Shou
Ti-Tang; Ti-Kung; Bai-Ma-Sya-Shan
Tsui Pa Hsien
Tieh-Hsien Chuan
Tien-Hsueh
Tien-Shan-Pai
Tiger Claw
Tiger Crane
Tongbei
Tsai-Chia Chuan
Tsai-Li-Fu
Tsien Tao
Tso-Ku Shu
Tsui Chuan Lo Han Tao
Tsui Pak Hsien (“Drunken”)
Lok Hop Tsui Pak Hsien (“Drunken Six Harmonies”)
Tuan Chuan
Tung Pi; Tungpi Chuan
Tung-Hai Chuan
Two Element Boxing
Two Instruments
Tzu Men Chuan
Tzujan Men; Tsu-Jan Men
Ving-Tsun
Wah Kuen
Wah Lum Tam Tui
Wah-Lum; Wa-Lum
Wei-To Men
Wenjin
White Crane
White Eyebrow
White Lotus
Wing Chun; Wing-Tsun; Ving-Tsun; Yung Chun
Futshan Pai
Jiu Wan
Man Yip
Pan Nam
Wood Monkey
Wu Chuan
Wu Kung
Wu Shong Tuo Kao
Wu Wei
Wu-Tang
Wudang
Xin-Yi
Xing-Chiao (“Eagle Claw”)
Eagle Claw Fan-Tzu
Ying Jow Pai (“Northern Eagle Fist”)
Xingyiquan
Yee Chuan
Yen Ching Chuan
Yi-Quan
Ying Jow Pai
Ying Yee Chuan
Yu Chia
Yueh San-Shou
Yueh-Fei Chuan
Yueh-Lien Chuan
Yung-Chun Chuan
Zhao
Zuijiuquan (“Drunkard’s Boxing”)

Well that was list of 335 Kung Fu styles.>

Post: setsu nin to:

I finde two more lists on the net, but there are all styles that are already on these list.>

Post: asag2:

I didn’t realize there were that many styles of kung fu. Are all of those individual styles or techniques/forms within other styles?>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

There are some 5000+ known styles of Chinese martial art, but many of them are derivatives, syntheses or subsets of other styles. Perhaps a more efficient way would be to group the styles into families, since many of them are closely related by origin and practice, eg. the Shaolin and Taoist families.>

Post: setsu nin to:

Hammerhead

Yes, you are right. For example one Kung Fu style is Monkey Kung Fu, but there are Drunken Monkey, Lost Monkey, Stone Monkey, Tall Monkey, Wood Monkey which are all styles of Monkey Kung Fu.>

Post: Fa Jing:

didnt different families in various dynasties have their own variations of the same styles?>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

What would happen is a man learns Kung Fu (in Shaolin or from family members) then adapt it for him, he will find his Kung Fu, then probably name it and pass it down, through his family.>

Post: setsu nin to:

BLACK PANTA

Yes, and its normal in my opinion. We are all diferent and if something works for you it doesnt mean that it works for me too. So people often changed martial arts and make new styles just to adapt art to themselfs.>

Post: DAT:

Item: White Crane

There are two White Crane styles which are quite different and come from varied origins. First there is the more popular Fukien White Crane which has become the basis for many Okinawan karate systems. Then there is the Tibetan White Crane which combines Crane and Ape. This system has also evolved into Lions Roar, Hop-Gar and Lama Kung Fu.>

Post: DAT:

It’s not widely known that there are five distinctly different styles of Wing Chun being practised in Foshan (ancestoral home of WC) today. These styles are Leung Jan, Pao Fa Lein, Wan Qi Shang, Guo Bao Chuang and Zhu Zhong Weng.

Here’s some insight into one of these rare WC systems: Pao Fa Lein.

This style is said to have its roots in the Shaolin Monastery in Henan Province and was taught by a Buddhist monk whose nickname was Big East Wind. On leaving the Shaolin Monastery Big East Wind travelled south to Ching Yuen village. The Buddhist monk was a member of a secret society whose aims were to overthrow the Ching Government.

He made friends with two brothers Tse Kwok Cheung and Tse Kwok Leung. One of the brothers was a magistrate.

Big East Wind taught the two brothers his complete system before returning to the north. Soon the two brothers became fed up with their jobs and returned to their home in Foshan.

The two brothers adopted a son whose name was Liu Da Sheng. At the age of nine Liu began to learn the Wing Chun system which he mastered in ten years.

Many stories are told about Liu’s fighting prowess. While still young a Kung Fu master by the name of Peng challenged him to a fight with the Millstone Broadswords. Liu killed the master and fled Foshan for fear of prosecution.

He returned around 30 years later and hoped to keep a low profile but his reputation was to great.

Hearing his skill a magistrate challenged him to a duel again with the Millstone Broadswords. Not wanting to make the same mistake Liu suggested that they use one wooden sword and one metal one, the magistrate agreed.

After the fight the magistrate’s clothes were left in tatters by the wooden broadsword.

When he grew older he worked in a cosmetics shop making hair gel from sap. This process was called Pao Fa Lein so this became Liu’s nickname.

The present day Grandmaster is Chu Chung who now lives in Hong Kong. Grandmaster Chu began his studies at the age of 14 and had learned the complete system before leaving for Hong Kong.

In Foshan the style was always known as Wing Chun but on his arrival in Hong Kong he found other styles of Wing Chun being taught so to differentiate his style from the others he named it after his teacher Pao Fa Lein.

Grandmaster Chu has never wanted to promote his style and has only taken a few disciples, namely his two sons Chu Wing Chi, Chu Ping and Mok Poi On.

The style has many forms for both fist and weapons (the first three have the same names as the Yip Man system) and ten weapons forms, these are Millstone Broadsword, Staff, Sword, Tiger Fork, A broadsword with a long wooden handle, Kwan Dao, Thirteen Section Whip, Millstone Broadsword versus Staff, Broadsword versus Broadsword and Staff versus Staff.

The style also has four wooden dummy forms. These are known as the Internal Dummy, External Dummy, Hard Dummy and Soft Dummy. The Dummy also has a sandbag mounted on each side.>

Post: The Axe Murderer:

Isn’t Chinese Boxing like Kempo?>

Post: Gong||Jau:

I think Chinese Boxing is a somewhat outdated term. Older translations of art names and words in general translate some words into “boxing” that refer more to fighting in general (I think the current accepted translation is “fist”). Example: Xingyiquan = Form Mind Fist/Form Mind “Boxing”. If you have a more in-depth question about this, ask Wilhelm, not me, since he’s the resident expert on the language (I don’t even speak it – I just know a few words).>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

Wouldn’t Chuan Fa be closer to Kempo?>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

Quanfa and kempo are exactly the same when written – the characters are just pronounced differently depending on your choice of language.>

Post: lakan_sampu:

I just read now something about Feng Wei in Tekken 5….His art is Chinese KENPO, yes, kenpo…I thought kenpo was japanese but…It’s a little bit misleading…
Is there such a Chinese Kenpo?>

Post: Hengest:

[quote=lakan_sampu I just read now something about Feng Wei in Tekken 5….His art is Chinese KENPO, yes, kenpo…I thought kenpo was japanese but…It’s a little bit misleading…
Is there such a Chinese Kenpo?[/quote 

Don’t read too much into the word “kenpo” mate. It’s a very broad term and, contrary to popular belief, doesn’t actually refer to a single style in the original Japanese.

I have the Japanese edition of Tekken 5 and I just checked the instruction booklet to see what Feng Wei’s style is in Japanese. As I suspected, it’s simply “chugoku kenpo”, which, roughly translated means “Chinese ch’uan fa” or “Chinese boxing”. What’s happened here is that whoever translated the info on the game from the Japanese got sloppy and translated the “Chinese” part, but not the “kenpo”.

To answer your question directly, I suppose you could say there’s such a thing as Chinese kenpo: it ch’uan fa or kung fu, nothing more.>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

yeah one of those fighting games has a dude and a chick’s style as JKD, when it was Jun Fan.>

Post: Stg:

[quote=BLACK PANTA yeah one of those fighting games has a dude and a chick’s style as JKD, when it was Jun Fan.[/quote 

virtua fighter 4. not really much of jkd though, just the jab/cross(and sloppy looking at that) and one kick. the rest is stuff that bruce either did in the movies or just made up stuff.>

Post: lakan_sampu:

Oh I see…thanks guys…

that one leads me to another question…what’s Jet Li’s style? I read that he’s one of Beijing’s wushu team members in his youth….
1 more thing…what’s the style he used in “The One”? the harder one…the “bad” Jet Li’s….>

Post: Gong||Jau:

He uses a pretty ubiquitous style known as Ko Re Ogra Fe. He was a member of the national wushu team I believe, but that’s all gymnastics and forms competition, not combat. Everything in his movies is just movie fu.>

Post: lakan_sampu:

Just as I thought….his hard form there resembles shotokan bassai dai a little. Anyway that’s movie stuff….

In Matrix, they say its Kung Fu in the movie but I can’t recognize anything like the art that was said…the scenes are more like karate to me…

The sibling characters there at virtua fighter has jkd on their info, and yes, it didn’t look that much like jkd though.

Is JKD qualified to be called a chinese art? I think Bruce Lee came up with it when he was already an American citizen…>

Post: Hengest:

[quote=Gong||Jau He uses a pretty ubiquitous style known as Ko Re Ogra Fe. [/quote 

Man, what a muppet I feel. I just did a search for this on Google before realising that I am, in fact, a moron. :oops:

I’d hesitate to call JKD a Chinese art. It’s development has taken place almost totally in the US, after all.>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

Bruce is Chinese so I would call JKD a chinese concept. Besides JKD has a lot of chinese influence in it anyways.

Jet Li apparently trianed in many different styles of KF. I’ve read he was trained in Pia Gua under GM Ma Xianada. The reason Matrix moves looked more like Karate is because, Karate is very similar to KF. Also it’s hollywood, so nothing’s real especially when you have to teach someone to look like he can kick ass in a hurry.>

Post: zefff:

I would call JKD a human art.

Even if JKD were mostly CMA influenced it still wouldnt be a Chinese art IMO because the other influences changed the man and his methods and approach to combat almost totally.

The root might lie in CMA because thats where his training started but his understanding grew far beyond its roots.>

Post: lakan_sampu:

thanks guys…

I’d hesitate too to call jkd a CMA for reasons stated above.>

Post: nbotary:

Hshing-I, 9-Bird, Monkey, Eagle, Dragon, Tiger, Crane, Snake, Mantis, Choy Lee Fut, Hung-Gar, Wing Chun, Tai Chi, Baqua, Long Fist, Wu Shu, Drunken…>

Post: setsu nin to:

nbotary

“Hshing-I, 9-Bird, Monkey, Eagle, Dragon, Tiger, Crane, Snake, Mantis, Choy Lee Fut, Hung-Gar, Wing Chun, Tai Chi, Baqua, Long Fist, Wu Shu, Drunken…”

Sorry, whats all that about?>

Post: buicken:

they are all on the chang palace’s lunch special menu.
nbotary must be hungry.>

Post: Hengest:

I think, setsu, he’s going back to the original reason for the thread, listing as many Chinese styles as we can.>

Post: setsu nin to:

yes, i totaly forgot orginal reason of these thread…>

Post: eagerdragon:

You guys should check out this website called hasayfu.com. It is by a student of Grandmaster Wing Lam.>

Post: Cabin-Dao:

Interesting language note.

Kung Fu (or ‘gong fu’ in standard Mandarin pronunciation) can be used outside of the martial arts world. ‘kung fu’, in it’s original use (I’ve been told) has a meaning closer to ‘spare time’. For example you can often hear people say in Chinese “I don’t have the kung fu to come visit you today”. However, it seems to also be used to mean development of a particular skill. I’ve also heard it said that someone who makes a really great cup of tea has a lot of kung fu. Interesting , huh? So it is pretty vague when a school or teacher says they teach “Wu Shu” (martial arts) or “Kung Fu”.

I’d be interested in seeing that list of schools broken down into internal and external arts. Has anyone run into any internal arts other than Tai Ji, Xing Yi, or Ba Gua?

-Julie
http://www.cabin-dao.com>

Post: adamthelast:

There is one style that i think no one has listed. It’s the only style i practice actually, Jow Ga(or Zhou Jia) Kung Fu.>

Post: Hengest:

Jow-ga was added to the list three years ago by setsu nin to . :)>

Post: Gazelle:

Quoting: Cabin-Dao;41282 Interesting language note.

Kung Fu (or ‘gong fu’ in standard Mandarin pronunciation) can be used outside of the martial arts world. ‘kung fu’, in it’s original use (I’ve been told) has a meaning closer to ‘spare time’. For example you can often hear people say in Chinese “I don’t have the kung fu to come visit you today”. However, it seems to also be used to mean development of a particular skill. I’ve also heard it said that someone who makes a really great cup of tea has a lot of kung fu. Interesting , huh? So it is pretty vague when a school or teacher says they teach “Wu Shu” (martial arts) or “Kung Fu”.

I’d be interested in seeing that list of schools broken down into internal and external arts. Has anyone run into any internal arts other than Tai Ji, Xing Yi, or Ba Gua?

-Julie

http://www.cabin-dao.com

Interesting, yes, but, not unreasonable. If you think about it logically, to develop a skill one needs time, so, it does not seem unreasonable to use a word associated with ‘spare time’ for both.>

Post: peajay:

on a similar but opposite tack…
I’ve been told the name translates near to “Hard Work”
along the lines… Anything worth doing is worth working at. and it takes hard work to be proficient at Kung Fu…

so… all you Mandarin speakers… whats closest??>

Post: Hengest:

Quoting: peajay;48614 on a similar but opposite tack…
I’ve been told the name translates near to “Hard Work”
along the lines… Anything worth doing is worth working at. and it takes hard work to be proficient at Kung Fu…

so… all you Mandarin speakers… whats closest??

You’re closest peajay. “Spare time”, I’m afraid, is way off the mark.

The first character, “kung”, means “achievement” or “success”. The second, “fu”, means “man” or “husband”. Combined, the compound is usually translated as “labor”, “skill” or “effort”.>

Post: Gazelle:

Quoting: Hengest;48625 You’re closest peajay. “Spare time”, I’m afraid, is way off the mark.

The first character, “kung”, means “achievement” or “success”. The second, “fu”, means “man” or “husband”. Combined, the compound is usually translated as “labor”, “skill” or “effort”.

Good to know. Thanks:)>

Post: zefff:

Good to forget because when someone stabs you in the chest or thrusts a pint glass in your face its hurts whatever language you speak. :rolleyes:>

Post: Bloodybirds:

Generally, there are 435 styles, and many more systems. This does not include the major internal styles of tai chi (5 major ones of Wu, Wu Hao, Sun, Yang, and Chen), ba gua and its derivatives, and hsing- i. As an example, there are 12 systems of preying mantis,including 7 star, tonglongquan, southern, 8-step, 7-harmony, etc. Then you have derivatives of Ying Jow and several northern and southern animal systems: there is the 12 animal, 10 animal, separate animals like mantis, bak mei snake, dragon, leopard, tiger (fu), panther, white crane, hawk, stork, drunken xinjinquan system/form, etc.

There is 10 row tan tui, 12 row tan tui (style, system, or form depending upon who you talk to) etc. Soooo…before we get into a list, I believe we should form a consensus on what is defined as a style, as a system, and as a form. For instance, in old Chinese style books, the words move and form may be interchangeable.

My 2 cents worth.>

Post: Hengest:

zefff: Should I forget my address as well, cos that’s not gonna help stop a pint glass to the face either. :rolleyes:

Bloodybirds: I agree in principle old chap, but since this list was started three years ago and the thread is now six pages long, I think it’s a little late to start worrying about parameters. ;)>

Post: Gazelle:

Quoting: Bloodybirds;48643 There is 10 row tan tui, 12 row tan tui (style, system, or form depending upon who you talk to) etc. Soooo…before we get into a list, I believe we should form a consensus on what is defined as a style, as a system, and as a form. For instance, in old Chinese style books, the words move and form may be interchangeable.

My 2 cents worth.

I agree. Wouldn’t be much point in speaking the same words and meaning different things. We wouldn’t understand eachother, same words or not, their different meanings would mean we’re speaking a different language.>

Post: Bloodybirds:

Hengest, I will not be 50 until next year, so please acknowledge a transition stage at least, young whippersnapper!! LOL! I did not realize this thread was 3 years old. Most of the styles have been listed but, as an example, I saw dim mak listed as a style, as well as xinjinquan or drunken…..dim mak is an external technique manifested with internally adverse results to the blood circulatory system and chi progress through the meridians, drunken is a form/system present in many northern systems, and while there is one style of mantis, there are 12 systems under it…..soooo, as I said, I believe the list provided was really good but still incomplete and also needed to be parsed some. Of course, we did not get into North v. South, why the styles are so different, family v. Shaolin (for instance my Ying jow, white crane, and long fist could be considered potentially Shaolin but my Nine Bird is a family style from my Shaolin master’s master in Hong Kong. Chen style tai chi is essentially a family and village style/system, that propagated the other four major branches of tai chi and their derivatives).

Just like there are several ryu systems of Okinawan karate, derivatives of Wing chun/tsun, etc. I agree with the comments maybe it is too late to categorize or define so I will leave my comments at that.

Not bad for an old chap, huh Hengest!! That is okay, I lived in English territories for a total of 3 years (Hong Kong and London) so old chap over there is actually still complimentary I hope….LOL!!>

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