most/least practiced kung fu

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most/least practiced kung fu
Original Poster: Fa Jing
Forum: Kung Fu Styles, Chinese Martial Arts
Posted On: 27-04-2004, 11:54

Orginal Post: Fa Jing: what style of kung fu do you all think is the most practiced in the world today? also the least practiced? (or known about)

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

Without a doubt, I would say Yip Man Wing Chun – the style with the best marketing success :lol:

However, it depends on what you mean by most-practiced – are you talking about an actual demographic percentage of the entire population of Chinese stylists worldwide? If so, in terms of sheer demographics, I would say that, while Wing Chun has a sizeable chunk of the populace, it may well lose out in terms of numbers to styles like Hung Gar and especially Chow Gar, which are closely linked to the lion-dance troupes (Chow Gar is quite possibly the most common style in Southeast Asia, come to that). Also, it has competition from Taijiquan, which is practiced for therapeutic reasons by a huge chunk of the ageing population worldwise and especially in East Asia.

Far as least-practiced or least well-known, there are countless Chinese styles that have probably never ventured outside their native counties for generations, and plenty that may have only one practitioner this generation! Some of the really rare (and possibly soon-to-be-extinct) styles I’ve heard of are Duck Fist (yes, duck), Turtle-and-Ox Fist (only practiced in Hunan province) and Hokkien Dog Fist (also called Ground Dragon Fist – a highly-acrobatic groundfighting style from Hokkien province).>

Post: Fa Jing:

i agree with you totally on wing chun Hammerhead

one of the least known styles of the modern era i think is Bac Fu Do>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

What’s Bac Fu Do? Certainly something I’ve never heard of :shock:

That, and judging by the ‘Do’ appended onto the end, it sounds like a recent creation (and that of an unscrupulous, money-grubbing Hong Kong-er :P – or at least a Cantonese) since traditional Chinese styles never call themselves the ‘way’ of anything.>

Post: Blade:

Tai-Chi followed by Wing Chun. Excluding china.
Least practiced would be tough because of the many styles available, my teacher mentioned Duck gung-fu once and until now ive never heard of it, must be wicked.>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

I would say to my knowledge that The Shaolin methods, like of course, Shaolin, WC and Tai Chi are the most practiced. Wushu as well is well known and practiced.

As far as the least I would say are the Panther styles of Shaolin. I have heard of some Panther styles but have never seen them. Also I would think White Crane, for I have also heard and seen a bit of it, but never enocountered a practictocktitioner of either.>

Post: Mr.Cool:

Quote:
what style of kung fu do you all think is the most practiced in the world today? also the least practiced? (or known about)

Most practiced would be taiji without a doubt. Least practiced would probably be something none of us has ever heard of :P>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

[quote=Mr.Cool 
Quote:
what style of kung fu do you all think is the most practiced in the world today? also the least practiced? (or known about)

Most practiced would be taiji without a doubt. Least practiced would probably be something none of us has ever heard of :P[/quote 

Make sence, smartguy :lol:>

Post: asag2:

I would say the most practiced holds a tie between WC, Hung Gar, and tai chi. Not only are they practiced throughout mainland China but they have gained immense popularity all over the world.

As for the least practiced it is almost impossible to say, but of the ones i am familiar with I would say something like southern praying mantis. IF you do any research on it you will find that it was a closely guarded secret and getting a master to teach it to you was almost impossible if you were not in the family.

I am sure that there are/were countless other styles that are either extinct or on the road to being so that we will never know because of the reluctance to pass on the style. :cry:>

Post: Blade:

Wing Chun is pretty popular in the Martial Arts community but unknown to outsiders. but almost everyone knows what Tai-Chi is.
i doubt Hung-Gar is close to wingchun in numbers. atleast outside of china.>

Post: Fa Jing:

[quote=Hammerhead What’s Bac Fu Do? Certainly something I’ve never heard of :shock:

That, and judging by the ‘Do’ appended onto the end, it sounds like a recent creation (and that of an unscrupulous, money-grubbing Hong Kong-er :P – or at least a Cantonese) since traditional Chinese styles never call themselves the ‘way’ of anything.[/quote 

Bac Fu Do aka White Tiger Kung Fu…..its an eclectic mix of Northern Sil Lum, Choy Lay Fut, Wing Chun, and my sifu some Escrima and Jujitsu to me as well but not to expert level………basically if you get a brown belt (yes we used belts) you are as capable as a black belt just w/o prayin mantis and crane styles (brown is as high as i got before i dropped out i was a stupid kid i guess)
he was Filipeano by the way>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

Oh, White Tiger. Roger that – I’ve heard of it before, just that most people call it by the English name, so the Canto name caught me off guard :wink: What’s in the syllabus?>

Post: lakan_sampu:

yah, WC. Maye because of the influence Bruce Lee lefy and so on….>

Post: Mr.Cool:

Quote:
Bac Fu Do aka White Tiger Kung Fu…..its an eclectic mix of Northern Sil Lum, Choy Lay Fut, Wing Chun, and my sifu some Escrima and Jujitsu to me as well but not to expert level………basically if you get a brown belt (yes we used belts) you are as capable as a black belt just w/o prayin mantis and crane styles (brown is as high as i got before i dropped out i was a stupid kid i guess)

Seems like a poor choice of name since there allready was another White Tiger kungfu style… I’d think people would get confused :P>

Post: Fa Jing:

^ what? illaberate if you would please>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

AnomalE and Hammerhand, White Tiger is called Pai Hu Shih in cantonese. I never heard of Bak Fu Do as being white tiger. I have never heard of Bak Fu Do to be honest. I know of White Tiger because it is the sucession style of my School. I have confirmed the Cantonese name with a friend of mine from China. (Side note, his family lives in Honan Province), He acts as though visiting the Shaolin Temple is no longer a big deal. What an ass. What language is Bak Fu do? And are you sure this is actually Kung Fu? I honestly haven’t heard of it, and I am not saying it is not kung fu because I haven’t heard of it.>

Post: 8LimbsScientist:

Least practiced outside of China: Perhaps White Ape TongBei?>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

TongBei is definitely a rare style outside of China, but I would contend that there are probably a thousand village or family styles that have never even been heard of outside their region. Perhaps we should confine this to more ‘mainstream’ or universally-practiced styles?

Panta: Bai Hu Shi is mandarin, bro. It would be Bak Fu Sik in Canto. I certainly haven’t heard of a ‘Do’ form of this style, either, though I’ve heard of White Tiger itself.

Edit: Oh, and ‘Do’ is Canto for the same word pronounced ‘Dao’ in Mandarin, and means ‘Way’. It could well have gained that name about the time CMA first started to go commercial in the west, ie. round about the time Brucie’s JKD hit the scene.>

Post: Fa Jing:

i was told Back Fu Do aka White Tiger Kung Fu i know its a forum of kung fu because of the mantis and crane substyles involved in it…..my sifu was from the phillipeans…..thats where he learned it…….the rest of its history is unknown to me but if anyone finds out please let me know>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

Hammer i think you are rite Pai Hu Shih is mandarin. I get the two mixed up alot. I will confirm with my buddy though. And Yeah the Chinese usually say style instead of way. I looked up Bac Fu Do on the net and I just skimmed, but from what I understand, the art originated in Australia. If I’m not mistaken.>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

Panta: It’s quite possible, since a lot of schools were opened up in Australia during the 70s and 80s, and many old schools actually changed their names to ride the karate and JKD craze. In fact, this Bak Fu Do just might be an old style taught under a different name. Of course, the kali escrima and such may have been added on later. Oh, and I am Chinese, you silly cat, you :P Why else do you think I speak both Mandarin and Cantonese (the most abominably common Chinese dialect in the world outside China)? :P Still, no worries – do go check with your buddy and tell me if he tells you different so I can goggle at my screen in disbelief :lol:>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

lol sorry bro I didn’t know you are Chinese. You know better than I.>

Post: Mr.Cool:

Quote:
^ what? illaberate if you would please

White Tiger kungfu is White Tiger Kungfu(at least the system I’ve heard about here in the U.S.), a fairly old style headed by Grandmaster Doo Wai and not a combination style. They call it Bak Fu Pai. Here’s a website about it: http://www.tigerkungfu.com/index.php>

Post: Mr.Cool:

Here’s the Bak Fu Do website: http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/9803/articles.htm>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

[quote=BLACK PANTA lol sorry bro I didn’t know you are Chinese. You know better than I.[/quote 

LOL, no worries at all, bro – I wrote that round about 3 in the morning when my brain had gone to bed but my body was still up and typing :mrgreen: Still, did you check with your Chinese friend?>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

nope I didn’t yet. It is tough to get in touch with him. And dude you gotta get more sleep.>

Post: asag2:

From what I have heard of white tiger style kung fu it is called Bak Fu Pai and is considered a very complete kung fu style.>

Post: Gong||Jau:

Most practiced – “therapeutic” Tai Chi (i.e. recreation hour at the retirement home :mrgreen:), Ip Man Wing Chun, real Tai Chi, Hung Gar (not in the states, but in China for sure)

Other ones I’ve seen a lot of but I don’t think are nearly as prevalent: Choy Lay Fut, Shaolin Five Animals

Least common: mainstream, I know Bak Mei is almost nonexistant in the U.S., and that even the most well-known practitioner doesn’t know all of the forms, but as Hammerhead said I’m sure there are family and village styles that have less than ten living practitioners.>

Post: TigerPaw:

I vote Elephant kung fu as least practiced.>

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