Practicality of Chinese Martial Arts

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Practicality of Chinese Martial Arts
Original Poster: Stazzy
Forum: Kung Fu Styles, Chinese Martial Arts
Posted On: 02-05-2006, 19:22

Orginal Post: Stazzy: Just out of curiosity, has anyone here had to use Chinese martial arts in a street fight? I know the techniques work, and I’ve had their applications tested on me (thanks Bloodybirds, Nbotary, and Wushu :lol: ) quite a few times. I’m just interested in seeing other people’s experiences with applying what they’ve learned outside of the classroom.

Post: Hengest:

I’ve used wing chun several times. As I’ve said before on this site, I swear by it as a style. I’ve studied a lot of different styles and wing chun, so far, is the only one that’s saved my arse on more than one occassion.>

Post: Gangsta_Nerd:

I used T.K.D. when I was in a “fight” in Elementary School; but, T.K.D. is a Korean art, isn’t it?!

I guess I should shut the hell up! :lol: :wink: >

Post: nbotary:

Gangsta – yeah, it’s a Korean art.>

Post: zaius:

wow. i haven’t posted in ages here.

anyways, yah, i have used wing chun once. honestly, it works in close range. like all things, once you hit the person once or twice in the face or the sense you can penetrate their defences, they back off pretty fast.>

Post: zaius:

weird my join date says march 10 2005. i’m pretty sure i joined in like 2002.>

Post: dscott:

[quote=zaius weird my join date says march 10 2005. i’m pretty sure i joined in like 2002.[/quote 

Because this is a “new” forum format. It was changed on March 10, 2005. Everyone has that date now.>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

Dr. Zaius Dr. Zaius…………….Dr. Zaius DR. ZAIUS………..dr. Zaius dr.Zaius………….aaaaaaaaaahhhhh DR. ZAIUS.>

Post: samurai6string:

….A come an’ rock me Dr. Zaius. (The Simpsons are so awesome.)>

Post: Wong_Kei_Ying:

This is my first post

I’ve studied Shaolin for 15 years, and studied other martial arts and other Chinese Styles during that time as well… Right now, along with my Kung-fu, I’ve taken an interest in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu… Although I haven’t had the opportunity to use my grappling in a confrontation (God Willing I won’t)… Take it from me for what it is worth, Chinese Martial Arts do work on the street, especially in a multiple attacker situation…>

Post: bamboo:

Welcome WKY.

I look forward to reading more from a 15 year practitioner.

-bamboo>

Post: nbotary:

That makes two of us!!! Welcome WKY… :D

By the way, who is your Sifu and what style KF do you practice???>

Post: samurai6string:

Welcome to your new obsession, I mean uh.. the forums WKY!!>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

I like the name Kei Ying. It’s like you knew i admired Kei Ying. Nowadays no one really remembers Fei Hung had a father.>

Post: Gazelle:

[quote=BLACK PANTA I like the name Kei Ying. It’s like you knew i admired Kei Ying. Nowadays no one really remembers Fei Hung had a father.[/quote 

Black Panta, surprise or not, i have no idea who you are on about.

And, a ‘hello’ and welcome from me Wong_Kei_Ying! I think it’s good to study more than the one style, or even type of martial art, if possible, because you get to see the subtle differences in similar techiniques (generally a different way of going about things), and you get to see a few different ones. I would think it helps to hold a better understanding of the techniques you do in the style you began with too, and thus would probably help you in a street fight. I’ll stop there before i go a bit over the top!>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

[quote=Gazelle [quote=BLACK PANTA I like the name Kei Ying. It’s like you knew i admired Kei Ying. Nowadays no one really remembers Fei Hung had a father.[/quote 

Black Panta, surprise or not, i have no idea who you are on about.
[/quote 

Wong Fei Hung is a great hero of China. He was a master of Hung Ga among other styles of Kung Fu. He also played a prominent role in the Chinese upriseing against their English. His Father Wong Kei Ying, was also a very noted martial artist and doctor of Traditional Chinese medicine. He is very well known because he was the father of Wong Fei Hung. Fei Hung learned martial arts and medicine from his father. Just a small tidbit of history. For more information on Wong Fei Hung visit your local public library or google.com….(this message was brought to you by the good people of the Egg council…..”eggs, not just for breakfast anymore”)>

Post: Wong_Kei_Ying:

Thank you for your kind replies and warms welcomes

LOL, it seems I pegged this site as being mostly grapplers and Mixed Martial Artists who don?t know much about other styles, I?m glad I was wrong. To add further to the history if I may: although not as famous as his son, Wong Kei Ying was one of Southern China’s famous “Ten Tigers of Guangdong (Canton)” Father and son were both masters of the martial art Hung Gar, which Kei-Ying learned from Shi (Monk) Luk Ah-Choi, a classmate of Shi (Monk) Hung Hei-Gun. Some accounts say that Kei-Ying was first taught by Wong Taai, his father or his uncle (depending on who is telling the story), and then later sent to Luk Ah-Choi to complete his training.

I would be more than happy to relay my experiences and whatever bit knowledge I have or add to a topic.

To simply answer the question of Lineage: I have none… I studied under a
Man who knew several systems: Northern Chinese Shaolin Fist/Style (Song Shan Shaolin Si Quan [Mandarin  Sung San Siu Lam Pai [Cantonese ) Eight Diagram Fist (Ba Gua, Zhang) Drunken Fist (Zui Quan) Hung Gar Kuen. All of which are northern systems except Hung Gar. I’m well versed in each of them, however my style (personally) is obviously a synthesis of all the above.

Lastly [quote=Gazelle I think it’s good to study more than the one style, or even type of martial art, if possible, because you get to see the subtle differences in similar techniques (generally a different way of going about things), and you get to see a few different ones. I would think it helps to hold a better understanding of the techniques you do in the style you began with too, and thus would probably help you in a street fight. I’ll stop there before i go a bit over the top![/quote 
I agree…. But, it is for some, but not for all… it can get quite confusing (believe me I know!) I’ve seen many young Martial Artist falter, stray, loose interest, discouraged and/or diverted as a result of thirst for knowledge and lack of focus and determination. This is my only humble opinion of course, and no disrespect intended.>

Post: JH:

Quote:
(this message was brought to you by the good people of the Egg council…..”eggs, not just for breakfast anymore”)

So they’ve gotten to you to…>

Post: zefff:

Woooot!! Wooooooot!!!

…FREEZE!! THIS IS THE AVATAR POLICE!!! YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO RESIZE IT!!! :wink:>

Post: Gazelle:

Thanks, both to Wong Jei Ying and Black Panta.

[quote=Wong_Kei_Ying Mixed Martial Artists who don?t know much about other styles,[/quote 

I’m afraid i come under that description! Unfortunately.

[quote=Wong_Kei_Ying To simply answer the question of Lineage: I have none… I studied under a
Man who knew several systems: Northern Chinese Shaolin Fist/Style (Song Shan Shaolin Si Quan [Mandarin  Sung San Siu Lam Pai [Cantonese ) Eight Diagram Fist (Ba Gua, Zhang) Drunken Fist (Zui Quan) Hung Gar Kuen. All of which are northern systems except Hung Gar. I’m well versed in each of them, however my style (personally) is obviously a synthesis of all the above.,[/quote 

Nice!

[quote=Wong_Kei_Ying I agree…. But, it is for some, but not for all… it can get quite confusing (believe me I know!) I’ve seen many young Martial Artist falter, stray, loose interest, discouraged and/or diverted as a result of thirst for knowledge and lack of focus and determination. This is my only humble opinion of course, and no disrespect intended.[/quote 

I can understand that, but i would think doing 2 to start with wouldn’t be too bad, until you get profficient in them. Or even meet up with people doing different styles every now and again, just to give you a snip-it of a different view point every now and then.>

Post: Gazelle:

Wong Kei Ying, what does the caligraphy in your avatar mean?>

Post: Wong_Kei_Ying:

The caligraphy means (Top) dexterity/skill or art, (bottom) time.

Together it is Kung Fu (gong fu in pin yin. Pin Yin is the Romanization developed by the Chinese Government.)>

Post: dscott:

Welcome Wong Kei Ying. I look forward to seeing your contributions.

May I suggest that you post a little bit about yourself in these topics.

http://www.fightauthority.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=574

http://www.fightauthority.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=675>

Post: bamboo:

gong fu in pin yin. Pin Yin is the Romanization developed by the Chinese Government.)

Hmm, the romanisation eh?

I always wondered why they call it that?

-bamboo>

Post: bamboo:

Never mind, I just figured it out…duh!>

Post: samurai6string:

WKY> I can see how you could think it, but actually I think that “grapplers” probably constitute a slight minority on this site. Many people on this site are familiar with or train in a form of grappling, but I doubt that many would consider themselves to be “grapplers.” You could probably look at MMA in the same way, many people here are fans and competitors, but most them have a background in traditional martial arts. We are a pretty diverse group here, both in terms of our martial pursuits and our lives outside of martial arts. I hope you will have more pleasant surprises in the future :)>

Post: Gazelle:

Thank you very much. I always find it interesting to see how things are translated, because of the differences that seem to arise.>

Post: Wong_Kei_Ying:

[quote=bamboo Hmm, the romanisation eh?[/quote 

LOL We’ll talk…

[quote=samurai6string WKY> I can see how you could think it, but actually I think that “grapplers” probably constitute a slight minority on this site. Many people on this site are familiar with or train in a form of grappling, but I doubt that many would consider themselves to be “grapplers.” You could probably look at MMA in the same way, many people here are fans and competitors, but most them have a background in traditional martial arts. We are a pretty diverse group here, both in terms of our martial pursuits and our lives outside of martial arts. I hope you will have more pleasant surprises in the future :)[/quote 

I hope so as well, I’m beginning to see the diversity… I look foreward to any surprises that may arise.

[quote=Gazelle Thank you very much. I always find it interesting to see how things are translated, because of the differences that seem to arise.[/quote  You are most welcome…>

Post: Stazzy:

Thanks for stealing my post ya bloody thieves. Kidding of course :P .

But, yes, let’s get back to the original topic and expand a bit. What has your style been most effective against, vice versa? For example, do you tend to do better against muscle-bound body builders or medium-sized grapplers? Has anyone completely dominated you and made your martial arts seem inferior? I’m still trying to see how you guys have been using your knowledge/training to your advantage…not that I’m advocating you going to the local bar (or pub for Gazelle 8) ) and start shit with the first person that looks in your general direction. Well, enjoy the revived and slightly revised topic. :D>

Post: WushuPadawan001:

One can always be overpowered and/or out numbered. Of course technique can beat power and numbers. It?s one of those martial arts paradoxes. Hence the practicality of a martial art has little to do with the style (in this case Chinese) or the opponent (whomever it may be), but rather the ability of the martial artists to use his/her art effectively.

Are Chinese martial arts practical for real life situations? I cannot give you a definite answer. For me I say yes, but that is because I am willing to dedicate time, sweat, and blood to enhance my abilities. For one who does not practice and does not have an understanding of his art, then I say no.

If one wants his/her art to be effective then he/she must make it effective.>

Post: Gazelle:

Nicely explained wushu.

All martial arts, i would think have at least some effective techniques for given situations. If they did not, then it would not be a martial art. Therefore its up to the person to take the time to learn and understand about whatever the martial art they study be, so that one, they may apply the techniques swiftly and effectively and two, that they understand when to apply them. Practice allowing both point to become subconcious.

‘Bar’ sounds so much better than ‘pub’, don’t you think? Or is it just me? Around here, they call them either.>

Post: Hengest:

[quote=Gazelle ‘Bar’ sounds so much better than ‘pub’, don’t you think? Or is it just me? Around here, they call them either.[/quote 

I’d say they’re two different things.>

Post: Gazelle:

Some people say that ‘i’m off to the bar’ instead of ‘i’m off to the pub’, i think. But, yes, in my mind, a bar is where you get served in a restaurant, pub or whatever, and a pub is a place in which a bar lies. I still think ‘bar’ sounds better though.>

Post: Hengest:

[quote=Gazelle Some people say that ‘i’m off to the bar’ instead of ‘i’m off to the pub’, i think. But, yes, in my mind, a bar is where you get served in a restaurant, pub or whatever, and a pub is a place in which a bar lies. I still think ‘bar’ sounds better though.[/quote 

I was thinking more along the lines of a pub being a traditional alehouse where the clientele drink good beer and chat about the important things in life like football and birds while losing their week’s wages on the fruit machine.

A bar, on the other hand, is a soulless, chrome-plated establishment where wankers drink white wine spritzers and talk about pretentious crap like Czech New Wave cinema while listening to Maroon 5.

That’s what the Oxford English Dictionary says anyway.>

Post: Gazelle:

I’d love to see your oxford dictionary!>

Post: zefff:

Damn right Hengest but sadly bars are where the fit women are.>

Post: Hengest:

[quote=zefff Damn right Hengest but sadly bars are where the fit women are.[/quote 

Oh I know mate, I know… :cry:>

Post: Wong_Kei_Ying:

Let get back on track, shall we?

[quote=WushuPadawan001 One can always be overpowered and/or out numbered. Of course technique can beat power and numbers. It?s one of those martial arts paradoxes. Hence the practicality of a martial art has little to do with the style (in this case Chinese) or the opponent (whomever it may be), but rather the ability of the martial artists to use his/her art effectively.

Are Chinese martial arts practical for real life situations? I cannot give you a definite answer. For me I say yes, but that is because I am willing to dedicate time, sweat, and blood to enhance my abilities. For one who does not practice and does not have an understanding of his art, then I say no.

If one wants his/her art to be effective then he/she must make it effective.[/quote 

Wushu, you took the words right out of my mouth :D

[quote=Stazzy …What has your style been most effective against, vice versa? For example, do you tend to do better against muscle-bound body builders or medium-sized grapplers? Has anyone completely dominated you and made your martial arts seem inferior?…[/quote 

A grappler might think and say that he/she could best any striker and vice versa, Jiu-Jitsu is better than Karate because the Karate-ka has little to no knowledge of any ground fighting or Muay Thai is better than Tae Kwon Do for whatever reason, the list goes on… Unfortunately a lot of young inexperienced Martial Artists adhere to this methodology; this way of thinking is detrimental to a Martial Artist’s growth in my opinion. There is no ONE style that neither is better than another nor rises above the rest, it strictly depends on the individual’s skill as Wushu mentioned in his post.>

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