warm up!

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me warming up for the kyokushin training
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warm-up

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warm-up
Original Poster: lil’sword
Forum: Japanese Martial Arts
Posted On: 25-08-2005, 18:58

Orginal Post: lil’sword: As some of you are aware I’m running a karate club at my highschool and I’m trying to encorperate some fun warm-up activities before training. If you have any fun warm-ups/drills/beneficial games to sugest please go ahead.Thank-you.

Sincerely;
lil’sword

Post: The BadBoy:

We play Tag at my Judo club to warm up. Always great fun (nothing like watchiing some 40 somethings with shoddy knees trying to run around and change direction in feeble attempts to catch the younger ones).

Or get a lil nerf ball out and play soccer.>

Post: jlambvo:

Chinese fire drill is fun and good for practicing front break-falls :)>

Post: Wilhelm von Wänkensteïn:

What’s a Chinese fire drill? Is that the one in which you set fire to an outhouse, then do your best to shove your partners inside and hold the door shut from the outside and laugh really loudly while listening to their screams as they burn to death? :lol:>

Post: Gong||Jau:

When people here say it they mean to get out of a car at a red light, and everyone run around to a different door and get back in :|>

Post: lil’sword:

lol.
I hope when I play the game the BMW is really close. :D>

Post: jlambvo:

Hmm. LOL I think that’s called a Chinese Fire Drill too, perhaps. Gong’s that is. Oh wait, I think Wilhelms is still practiced in Texas. Aw %#*! I might have the name mixed up, I’ll just describe it.

Ok.. say you have 3 people lying stomach down on the floor in a row. From the top-down:

A-B-C

B starts barrel rolling toward C, who explosively pushes off the ground to leap (left) over him. Upon landing, C continues rolling to the left. A leaps over to the right and starts rolling that direction. At this moment the order is now:

C-A-B

But since A is now rolling to the left, B must leap to the left over him, then C over B, so next it looks like:

B-C-A

And so on in a continuous loop. I think you always need an odd number of people to do it. If you never let your body touch the ground (only toes and forearms) it’s especially a good workout and warm-up.>

Post: bamboo:

Quote:
If you have any fun warm-ups/drills/beneficial games to sugest please go ahead

I don’t belive in games during a martial arts practice. Warm up should IMHO be a time to get both the body and mind ready to learn. If you need to play games for teenagers to be interested, this could be a future problem when its time really practice and be aware of personal body movement.

This is not a slight at you lil’ sword, to each their own, just my opinion.

cheers, :D

steve>

Post: The BadBoy:

A good sport speific warm-up can is good too. Shome shadow boxing or a light round on the pads. Depends on what is available to you. But with kids its gotta be fun in my opinion.>

Post: BLACK PANTA:

we used to play this game in elementary school in Trinidad. The teachers would make us play who could stay the quietest the longest. The looser gets a strap right on the palms of your hands. You damn sure we stayed quiet.>

Post: jlambvo:

Bamboo:

Games ARE learning, in my opinion, especially activities that require both physical coordination combined with spontaneous problem solving. They energize people on a physical, perceptual, and emotional level. Granted, some kinds of games are better than others, and in this case I believe the “fun” warmups he is looking for would be physical activities that would provide the above.

I also personally think that although there certainly needs to be some sense of seriousness and urgency as to the material you are learning (martial arts is after all largely about how to efficiently maim and kill other humans), you should be wary of adopting a hyper-critical and serious attitude that takes yourself out of your day-today mode of thinking, because when you REALLY need to fall back on your training there won’t necessarily be a chance to change your mindset… and in some ways, trying to do so can distort your perceptions.

And, a “fun” spirit usually promotes exploration, “seriousness” often regresses to auto-pilot.

But then, I’m also young and relatively inexperienced, maybe its just my… erm… “diverse” attention showing through :) What do you think?>

Post: bamboo:

Quote:
you should be wary of adopting a hyper-critical and serious attitude that takes yourself out of your day-today mode of thinking, because when you REALLY need to fall back on your training there won’t necessarily be a chance to change your mindset…

I agree completely wit this statement, although I would point out that on and off the mat, we try to maintain the same mode of thinking.

Quote:
And, a “fun” spirit usually promotes exploration, “seriousness” often regresses to auto-pilot.

I also agree with this. :)

I’m not advocating ultra seriousness to the point of rigidity.

This is where I believe that people need to search for and hopefully find the type of training environment in which they thrive and love. At my dojo we try to maintain a joyous practice experience but not at the expense of mindset. We are trying to cultivate a certain way of living, an awareness if you will. With this in mind, the types of people that have membership where I practice tend to be rather serious and have studied other martial arts and are with us to practice gendai budo. These same people sport a huge smile when practicing and are the same ones with which I go for beer after practice.

We laugh and smile and joke and actually try to maintain the mindset off the mats all the time, yes we’re a bit stiff from the outside looking in, but we love and thrive in that environment.

I fully understand your point and appreciate what you’ve conveyed, I just think its a matter of personal preference. Ie: There are 4 dojos in my city in which I could attend, one is a mcdojo, 1 is “ki” oriented, one (yoshinkan) has a very regimented learning system and ours, which stress joyous but serious practice, no kids at the moment.

Quote:
But then, I’m also young and relatively inexperienced, maybe its just my… erm… “diverse” attention showing through What do you think?

I like think that 31 is not too old myself, i consider myself young :cry: :wink: , but then again its perspective right? I don’t think its a matter of age at all, just how you learn and what your doing at this moment while on the path.
You’ve reached nidan right? I suspect that that took quite abit of commitment and while your training environment may be different han mine, its our respective chosen path. No wrong, no right, just different.

I maintain that in our dojo we don’t play warm up games and likely never will, but we still have a huge amount of fun and truly love and believe in what we are doing.

Thank you for a thought provoking post Jlambvo!

take care,

steve>

Post: jlambvo:

Quote:
This is where I believe that people need to search for and hopefully find the type of training environment in which they thrive and love. At my dojo we try to maintain a joyous practice experience but not at the expense of mindset. We are trying to cultivate a certain way of living, an awareness if you will. With this in mind, the types of people that have membership where I practice tend to be rather serious and have studied other martial arts and are with us to practice gendai budo. These same people sport a huge smile when practicing and are the same ones with which I go for beer after practice.

I agree completely! Everyone must seek out the training spirit that feels most “at home.”

Here, well… we are usually told to “go play” with technique, and my teacher has taken to the interpretation of sanshin meaning the heart of a three-year old :) So in this way, “games” might not be out of place in all training, despite the inherently serious nature of it all.

This is not always the case, there is a time to be more “serious”; like all things, I think training spirit must breath in and out.

Quote:
I like think that 31 is not too old myself, i consider myself young , but then again its perspective right? I don’t think its a matter of age at all, just how you learn and what your doing at this moment while on the path.

:lol: I didn’t mean to imply anything about your age, but at 21 I am usually very self-conscious about commenting around people who I assume are my senior (and whom I have respect for). But the latter statement in this quote is an excellent point.

Quote:
You’ve reached nidan right? I suspect that that took quite abit of commitment and while your training environment may be different han mine, its our respective chosen path. No wrong, no right, just different.

I maintain that in our dojo we don’t play warm up games and likely never will, but we still have a huge amount of fun and truly love and believe in what we are doing.

Yes, I believe you offered a congratulations in another thread which I never acknowledged, so thank you by the way :)

Anyway, I appreciate where you are coming from. Who can really explain a love for budo except to other budoka? :wink:

I only wanted to give another perspective for the sake of ‘lilsword. That and most of our discussion aside, this is still regarding her high-school thing and I’m not sure the students have had a chance to cultivate the same passion for budo that some of us have :mrgreen:>

Post: bamboo:

Quote:
I only wanted to give another perspective for the sake of ‘lilsword. That and most of our discussion aside, this is still regarding her high-school thing and I’m not sure the students have had a chance to cultivate the same passion for budo that some of us have

The second sentence hit me hard when I read it. I get rather bogged down in my own training that I forget that others do not have the same appreciation or passion for budo as some. Your earlier point concerning both sanchin and games now make more sense to me.

Excellent posts mr. Jlambvo. :wink: If your ever in my neck of the woods, I’d love to train with you.

-s>

Post: setsu nin to:

You could use forms for warming up. First do some soft form and than some hrader.>

Post: surehit:

Hi All,

We do bodyweight exercises to warm-up. Core strength training gives you a good overall workout for combat conditioning purpose.

You may read more about it here:
http://www.karate-shotokan-kata.com/core-strength-training.html

Cheers,
Charles.>

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