Defending side/straight kick to the stomach area.

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Defending side/straight kick to the stomach area.
Original Poster: mth003
Forum: Muay Thai Boxing – Thai Martial Arts
Posted On: 02-04-2007, 14:45

Orginal Post: mth003: My first post:)

I’ve been doing Muay Thai for a while and in one of my sparring matches (MMA), my opponent would always launch these powerful “side kicks” (sort of like Taekwondo) to my groin / lower stomach area (Not a teep!). My natural reaction would be to bring my knee up as if checking a round-house kick. The knee would block the kick but would result in me being pushed away. I have also tried evading but the guy is twice as fast as I am, leading to bad results. I feel reluctant to try grabbing the kick because they are being launched so fast.

What I might try doing next time would be, as soon as the dude launches his kick i’ll throw a powerful round house to his supporting leg, sacrificing the hit but causing him to fall. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Post: samurai6string:

How about sort of a hard Gedan Uke to the outside of the leg while moving laterally and in?>

Post: Triple T:

work on your footwork. The easiest way to avoid any linear strike is to angle off of that trajectory. Ideally, you should wind up with the back of his leg facing you and plenty of targets for a counter attack. Speed, truthfully, should not be an issue because it takes more time and effort to chamber, rotate and kick than it does to take a step sideways.>

Post: Gazelle:

Footwork is always good to work on. If you have the space, i agree with TTT. When you are there, you have a tonne of options at your disposal. The other option is, if his postion allows is to actually go across and into him (stepping, that is), and then go pretty heavily for the head, for which, the guard may have dropped very slightly for the kick. But, i think the former is probably the safest option.

However, though that is probably one of the best options, i think this is just one thing you have to learn to do, and, if you can implement it then, good on you, made. You can step out of the way, but, if you have the time, do a nice crescent kick, making sure the heel goes into his thigh (can’t really do that in semi, but, i still know about it:) )…gives him a dead leg.

But. blocking, if you feel you’re not quick enough, work on it. Blocking can really be a handy skill. It can help open someone’s guard up, giving you space to get a nice punch into the head or, abs, with less ability for the opponent to resist.>

Post: nbotary:

Footwork is definately the key and the best solution to overcome your problem. But, I like to use add a more unorthodox, aggressive approach…

Now matter what, just remember that a front snap kick can only travel in one direction…

Have you tried to punch his kick??? By this I mean strike his foot, shin, or knee with an elbow or a fist. When you face off against someone who likes to use their feet, you need to pay attention to their body language or patterns they may show you. For example, does he always kick with the same leg??? If so, how is it positioned before he delivers the kick??? If you learn to see the signs, you can “anticipate” and counter before he has the chance to realize what’s happening. I do like the option of kicking the balancing leg; however, I would do it before the kick. In other words, if he is leading with his left leg and his right foot is behind him and he chambers up or has to pull his right leg from the back to kick, I would check his left leg at the knee or the calf and let him know that you’re onto his little game. If you’re going full contact, this will work even better because it’s not fun trying to balance and throw a kick with a bruised and sore knee or calf!!!

If he leads with his kicking leg, you can also do what I like to call a sweeping kick – sweep the ankle of the kicking leg before he draws it up to chamber it, take him off balance, and then strike his balancing leg at the ankle, the knee, the calf or inside of the thigh. This is a great move to get inside as it smothers your opponent by closing the gap and putting them in an awkward position. Bloodybirds has used this on myself and several others with brutal results.

Another option is to smother him. The only way for him to deliver a straight kick as you describe is to pull the leg up, chamber it and then extend the kick. As soon as he draws his leg up, rush in and close the gap. Not only will he not be able to throw the kick, but it will be less effective if he does manage to get it out. You can further add to his frustration by sidestepping into him. Assume you are facing in a North/South direction – he kicks with the right leg. To evade, you step out to your right in a North East direction with your right leg and quickly counter by stepping back into him with your left leg in a North West direction. If you’re quick enough, you can step inside or outside and behind his balancing foot with your countering foot and push him off balance. If you do this correctly, not only will he have missed his target, but you will be on top of him and he will be off balance as you counter, send him sprawling to the floor, and pummel the shit out of him. This works even better if he kicks with the right leg and you step North West with your left leg and then North East with your right leg as it puts you behind him and completely exposes his back and right side.

Finally, if you’re skilled at the art of chin na and your timing is good, you can side-step and evade the kick, “catch” the kicking foot, trap it into a lock and wrench it to either side. At the same time you will have free reign to do serious damage to his kicking foot, balancing leg and any future offspring. Do this enough times and I can guarantee your opponent will begin to think twice about using the same kick on you. However, this is not a move I would recommend if your timing and skill level are not up to an advanced level.>

Post: mth003:

Thanks a lot for the reply guys.

The last post is very informative and I’d we willing to put those strategies to the test. Our next spar is this Thursday, and I can’t wait to counter and try new techniques on this guy. Until then, I will post back how it goes.

Thanks again.>

Post: nbotary:

Sooooo… Any results from your sparring session???>

Post: mth003:

Hey all, sorry for the delay but I have the results…

The spar actually went well!!! Before the spar I practiced a lot of footwork and counters and it really payed off.

For those who don’t want to read the details further below, all i did was use boxing more than I did kicking; I got him square in the face many times, leaving him dazed and hitting the ground; Leaving me to be the winner this time.

He threw those straight kicks that I mentioned earlier and I just moved to the side (towards his back) deflecting / blocking his kick with my gloves and continued to pummel him with hooks and crosses. Also, another tip for the fighters out there…When you know a kick is going to come midsection, evade the kick but also strengthen your stomach muscles (this helps a lot just in case the kick does come in contact; you’d be surprised at how much power it can absorb, leaving you pain-free).

One problem I got myself into was…I did not kick properly. Although I had good hits / counters on my opponent, I found that most of my round-house thai kicks landed with my ankles instead of my shins! This really banged me up for a few days, I couldn’t walk straight because of it. I think it was because I wanted to keep my distance just enough so that I wouldn’t be hit by my opponent after my kicks. (Yes, I do step into my round-houses) The only possible answer to this is that I need to step in further or kick at a closer range. I learned that my low round houses are supposed to be within jabbing distance (but this seems really too close!) Am i supposed to do that?

P.S. We are having yet another spar next thursday (every week almost) I’ll try video taping it.
P.S.S. We spar with just gloves, no shin pads. Also no elbows or knees to the head.>

Post: Gazelle:

Quoting: mth003;48629 Hey all, sorry for the delay but I have the results…

The spar actually went well!!! Before the spar I practiced a lot of footwork and counters and it really payed off.

For those who don’t want to read the details further below, all i did was use boxing more than I did kicking; I got him square in the face many times, leaving him dazed and hitting the ground; Leaving me to be the winner this time.

He threw those straight kicks that I mentioned earlier and I just moved to the side (towards his back) deflecting / blocking his kick with my gloves and continued to pummel him with hooks and crosses. Also, another tip for the fighters out there…When you know a kick is going to come midsection, evade the kick but also strengthen your stomach muscles (this helps a lot just in case the kick does come in contact; you’d be surprised at how much power it can absorb, leaving you pain-free).

One problem I got myself into was…I did not kick properly. Although I had good hits / counters on my opponent, I found that most of my round-house thai kicks landed with my ankles instead of my shins! This really banged me up for a few days, I couldn’t walk straight because of it. I think it was because I wanted to keep my distance just enough so that I wouldn’t be hit by my opponent after my kicks. (Yes, I do step into my round-houses) The only possible answer to this is that I need to step in further or kick at a closer range. I learned that my low round houses are supposed to be within jabbing distance (but this seems really too close!) Am i supposed to do that?

P.S. We are having yet another spar next thursday (every week almost) I’ll try video taping it.
P.S.S. We spar with just gloves, no shin pads. Also no elbows or knees to the head.

I don’t have the knowledge to comment on the lack of s hin pads, but, if you want to go full contact at any rate, i suppose it would just have the ‘hardening’ affect, and help train you up.

I had noted about the stomach muscles before:). Not through sparring though, surpisingly, picked that one up as a real, real youngster (i know many still consider me as such now, but, i mean much, much younger than i am now:) ).lol

As for the kicks. Power round house kicks should be hitting with the shin, not the ankle (for some of the reasons it sounds like you discovered:)), and, not the foot (i have a feeling that could be because your ankle may not neccesarily take to the power too well). If that brings you within jabbing range then, so be it, as far as i’m concerned, and, it doesn’t seem an inreasonable comment. But, if you think about it, when you swing a kick in like that, you tend to lean back a bit to counterbalance at any rate, which may or may not take you out of their punching range, but, either way, if you block well enough and have a good guard, you should be fine:), you might even find it easier to get some counters, or to attack through the guard with some punches after you’ve finished the kick, if they are in punching range.

Have you ever tried the Blitz? You probably don’t know it under that name if you have. It’s really quite good if your a little further away (or even close). YOu sort of do a back fist with your leading hand, but, you sort of lean your weight forward first, and let the hand follow containing some of the momentum from your body. Just as your about to fall too far forward/lose your balance, you bring what was your back hand, and now becoming your front hand through with some good news (should carry some momentum again), remembering to cover your head with your then free hand, and let your self run through. Maybe it’s more of a semi move, but, my teacher used to love it.>

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