Low Carb help

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Low Carb help
Original Poster: darkside05
Forum: Weight Loss
Posted On: 13-04-2005, 23:57

Orginal Post: darkside05: Well guys, just to fill you in on my situation. I’m on the South Beach diet and have been on it for a few months. So far i’ve managed to lose 25 pounds but for some unusual reason, the past couple of weeks i’ve paused all weight loss. I’ve also noticed lately i just haven’t had the energy like i was getting for awhile. I’m pretty strict on my diet to the point i skip meals a lot (esp. at school) due to the fact that there just aren’t many options for me where i’m at and i absolutely refuse to give in to whatever people keep offering. I am working out every day with weights and every other day doing bag work and shadow boxing. Despite all of this stuff i’m doing, i just haven’t seen any results lately on the scales and i just don’t have any energy. I don’t want to give this diet up because i’ve come so far with it. If any of you have some advice to help me out please let me know, I’m growing desperate.

Post: angryrocker4:

How many calories and carbs are you taking in? I would stay away from the low carb stuff because alot of people end up killing their lean muscle mass. Dont focus so much on the scale, but on how much better you look and feel. Also realize very few people have the genetics to be “ripped” like you see in mags and on tv, besides chicks dig love handles.

Also your body may have hit the point where it knows your limiting intake of everything and its working to save all it can. The way I get around that is I get off whatever special “diet” im on for a couple weeks. I still eat healthy, but I wont let myself get hungry. Mainly the only thing I eat is chicken, tuna and steak with whatever fruit and veggies I can find at the moment. Cheating on your diet wont kill you either. Like having a cheeseburger cooked on a foreman grill is alright, Once or twice a week wont hurt. The “bodybuilder” diet I do is I eat every 2-3 hours in small portions as that helps keep your metabolism goin. and PROTEIN!! PROTEIN!! PROTEIN!

Change your workout routine, like switch the days you do body parts and rotate exercises themselves, this keeps your routine kinda fresh. Do your cardio in the morning on an empty stomach, as your body will use it’s stores for energy and you’ll notice faster results, and the longer cardio lasts the longer your metabolism will stay elevated after your workout, I’d do about 45-60 minutes. I do my cardio before weight training as that gives me better results.

I was just throwing some stuff out there as I dont know your specifics, but let me know if you need any help figuring out a routine for cardio and weights, I’ve been powerlifting for 3 years and its kinda my religion.>

Post: darkside05:

Wow man, thanks for the information, and also if you don’t mind, could you possibly send me some of your ideas for a routine on cardio and weights? The only thing holding me back in the mornings is that I have to get up early to go to school. If you have any more ideas to add for boosting metabolism, please let me know, thats been a big issue for me on my weight loss but i’m trying to work towards fixing that. Again thanks for everything.>

Post: NeverMan:

As far as Cardio in the morning, great idea if your not on a low-carb diet. Low carb diets are intended (for the most part) to put you into a state of ketosis where you switch your primary fuel source from carbs to fats. My point is that if you are on a low-carb diet, it shouldn’t matter when you run cuz fat will be your primary fuel no matter what time of day it is.

Myth: You burn lean muscle mass. That’s just absurd. Low-calorie diets will burn lean muscle mass, low carb diets will not. It’s funny that everyone thinks low carb diets are so new. They have been around for a LONG time (hundreds of years). Fat and Protein give make you feel fuller, so you eat less. Most carbs people eat are filled with simple carbs and burn up quickly, spiking your blood sugar levels and the rest being stored as fat in your body, which is why refined sugar is bad for you. Stay away from it if you can.

Personally, I don’t think there is anything wrong or bad about low-carb diets except the myths that people spread about them. These myths are usually spread by two kinds of people: people that have tried them and didn’t adhere to it and blame the diet for different faulterings<sp> and the other group are vegetarians.

A stall on a low-carb diet after a month or two or three is no big deal. If you stay on it, you will eventually get off the stall. Two things: Cyclic changes (like the post above mentioned) are good and also if you are hitting a stall, reduce your carbs a little more or change the carbs you are eating.>

Post: angryrocker4:

Sorry if I sound rude, I dont mean to I’m just not that articulate but how come is it when I see people on low carb diets, they never have solid muscle mass? They do lose weight but its not the right kind. It could be them screwing it up, but when most people do low carb they try to do zero carb for some dumb reason and the body turns to protein and muscle fibers as they are more readily available for immediate energy (or is that totally a miscoonception onmy part?). Whats considered low carb for the average (non power lifter) person? 60 -90? Personally, I dont go below 150 carbs cause then I’m just dead on my feet cause of the way I lift. never did the low carb thing personally but it goes against some of the powerlifter nutrition I’ve learned (i could still be wrong).

as for a routine, I do a body part each day of the week like MON-chest, TUE-legs WED-Shoulders THUR- Back FRI-Arms, but do the parts however you want, give chest and arms a day apart and legs and back a day apart. Start out light if your only a beginner at lifting, no more than 9 sets MAX per part and 5 sets for Biceps, triceps each. THis should be about 3 exercises per part for 3 sets. Keep the following as your base focus exercises per part:
Bench press (chest), squat (legs), deadlift(back and legs), Tricep extension(tris), Barbell curl(Biceps) Calf raises(legs) wide grip pullups (back) Front calf Raises(legs, very important)

there are many others but these are the must haves, if squats kill you you can replace with leg presses. I HIGHLY RECCOMEND GETTING ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER”S BODYBUILDING ENCYCLOPEDIA, or GOLD”S GYMS. these books will help educate and show proper form for everything you’ll ever need. Other exercise I like are:
Flys(chest), decline and incline bench press,
Leg extension and curl(legs of course), Hack squats, sissy squats(legs)
Barbell and D-bell shoulder shrugs(shoulders), front lateral raises(delts), side laterals, seated bent over laterals
T-bar rows, Lat pulldowns(back)

Keep the base exercises and rotate between the ones I just listed and that should keep your weight routine somewhat fresh, everything can be done with a barbell or dumbbells. The only machines I’d use if you go to a gym are Hammer strength machines as I think they are the best quality next to free weights.

CARDIO: I dont do it on leg days cause it may risk overtraining, but thats my body. I either run outside in the hilliest place I can or I’m on the elliptical machine cause I do have a bad knee. Running outside is always best though in my opinion. Other than what I’ve already said I dont know much more about boosting metabolism, but as you gain muscle mass it will increase for sure.

It kinda sounds like your in high school still, not sure but if your under 24 dont bother with any supplements as your body is still at the top of its game, whey protein if anything at all.

One major thing I learned in the army, take a week off from working out. Your body will get a boost from it (most people do anyway) and when you start back the next week you’ll notice a difference, whether its strength or fat loss or more energy, dont know til it happens. I do that myself once every 3-4 months, just to re energize the “cycle”. If your unsure of the proper form for an exercise LOOK IT UP AND USE LIGHT WEIGHT UNTIL YOU NAIL THE FORM PERFECTLY!! thats why I recommended the books :) If you do deadlifts with poor form you can seriously hurt yourself so use light weights at first on the unfamiliar exercises, be careful and ROCK OUT!!>

Post: angryrocker4:

I almost forgot, I recomend staying in the 6-12 rep range until you get a year in at least, if you cant do 6 reps its too heavy and if you can do more than 12 its too light.

Also, to keep your heart rate up a bit you can shorten the rest between sets to like 30-45 seconds. I wouldnt do it all the time but that may help.>

Post: NeverMan:

[quote=angryrocker4 Sorry if I sound rude, I dont mean to I’m just not that articulate but how come is it when I see people on low carb diets, they never have solid muscle mass? They do lose weight but its not the right kind. It could be them screwing it up, but when most people do low carb they try to do zero carb for some dumb reason and the body turns to protein and muscle fibers as they are more readily available for immediate energy (or is that totally a miscoonception onmy part?). Whats considered low carb for the average (non power lifter) person? 60 -90? Personally, I dont go below 150 carbs cause then I’m just dead on my feet cause of the way I lift. never did the low carb thing personally but it goes against some of the powerlifter nutrition I’ve learned (i could still be wrong).
[/quote 

Protein is the last fuel source the body looks for. If you are doing low-carb, it is important to not calorie count, as this will mess it up. It is important that you make sure you are not starving yourself, or the body will look to other sources. The WHOLE POINT of a low-carb diet is to burn the extra fat you have. One reason people look smaller to you maybe is the extra water weight they lose.

I am not a biologist, but from my understanding that the carbs bloat you and help you retain water in cells. So when you go low carb, most people lose A LOT of weight the first week or so. This weight is water weight. Drinking lots of water on a low-carb diet is important, but it is on any other diet also.

It should be fairly easy to gain muscle mass on a low-carb diet if you are weight lifting. You should not be losing muscle mass.

Also, if you need to lose a couple pounds in a week or so for a fight, or whatever (got a wedding coming up or something, I don’t know), low-carb is a good way to go.>

Post: angryrocker4:

It still doesnt make sense to me. If it takes over 3000 calories burned to lose 1 lb of fat but your not regulating calories, then that would make it harder it seems.

Carbs are the primary energy source for the body right, and the extra we know will turn into fat eventually, so limiting them to an extent makes sense, thus i go to 150. But protein is more easily turned into “short burst energy” because it breaks down into aminos and will fuel the vital organs if the body thinks its “starving” thats why the atkins diet has high protein in it, fat stores in the body are used for endurance activities, thats why marathon runners arent “ripped” like sprinters are. Because sprinters require massive amounts of energy at a time and the body is forced to grab it from the fat stores.

I think the problem may be when you dont get enough protein in combination and then it starts tearing down the muscle. Is what Im saying understandable? or is my science mixed up somewhere?

I’m going to look this up cause now I’m confused.>

Post: angryrocker4:

MWAHAHAHA!!! I found something!!, well it turns out we’re both kinda right. this page http://vibesconnect.com/?page=blogs&action=view_blog&blg_id=18

Has the most common myths and some “facts” of a low carb diet. #2 and 5 are the ones that relate to my arguements. I think myth#7 is bull cause it doesnt say what type of fat or how much, the disease and kidney stuff is only if your kidneys and liver are shot to begin with and the obesity part is irrelevant. I rest me case, :twisted:>

Post: NeverMan:

Dude, that’s a “VibesConnect” blog, from some random dude.

Anyways. I know from personal experience this:

I didn’t feel tired.
I didn’t have a hard time getting stronger.
I lost REAL weight (fat).

FACT: I did it the right way (mostly ate chicken and vegetables). On occasion I had pork, red meat and even the very occasional pork rind). Vegetables included non-starchy, leafy greens like Brocolli, collards, spinach, salads (ceasar salads with chicken and parm), and a few onions now and again. It takes discipline to do it right, it’s not as easy as they would like you to believe. Also, I drank lots of water. All my meals were self-prepared.

As far as the calories thing, the concept is this:

Fat and Protein make you feel fuller (no carb cravings so you eat less). If you are only intaking fat, then fat is what is being burned, not carbs. Follow?>

Post: angryrocker4:

damn i thought i had somethin, oh well ill be quiet now.>

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